Results 1–20 of 4055 for speaker:Baroness Hollis of Heigham

Independent Living Fund (23 Nov 1999)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, the independent living fund makes cash payments to enable severely disabled people to live independently in the community rather than face institutional or residential care. We are considering proposals which the trustees of the independent living fund put to us some months ago to provide their clients with greater financial benefit when they take up work.

Independent Living Fund (23 Nov 1999)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, my noble friend will know that an existing case which concerns someone who has been faced with this problem is being discussed by my noble friend and my ministerial colleagues. Therefore it would be improper for me to comment on that. My noble friend is right in that the Government are faced with a real problem here because there are two conflicting positions. On the first point,...

Independent Living Fund (23 Nov 1999)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, that is exactly right. Far from the trustees being grudging about this, they have raised the issue with government. In the introduction to his 6th report as chairman of the trustees, Mr Sydney Shore states, "The Government's policy is that disabled people should be encouraged to seek work if they are able to do so. I am conscious that our policies do not provide sufficient...

Independent Living Fund (23 Nov 1999)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, I have much sympathy with those comments. I remember someone who had previously been in residential care telling me that, with the aid of ILF, he was now in his own home with a wife and a job. His life had turned around. That is the importance of the ILF. The problem is that the ILF was devised back in the late 1980s as a consequence of the reforms to supplementary benefit and it...

Independent Living Fund (23 Nov 1999)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, since ILF was established, we have had not only the start of disability living allowance but of DPTC. Part of the Government's job is to "read across", if you like, and to ensure that our policies are consistent. The noble Lord, Lord Addington, is absolutely right, this is one of the avenues that we must explore.

Independent Living Fund (23 Nov 1999)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, the Government are looking at the more general caring issues as part of the remit of the Royal Commission on Ageing and so on. We also have a commitment to work with carers' organisations and to review their situations. There is also the wider issue of registration, whether it be of carers or of childminders, and so on. I shall certainly raise these concerns with the Department of...

Address in Reply to Her Majesty's Most Gracious Speech (23 Nov 1999)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: Parent with care.

Benefit Entitlement (30 Nov 1999)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, I am not sure that I entirely understand the Question. If I do, I am afraid that I do not agree with it. Anyone who has an underlying entitlement to a means-tested benefit may draw that benefit if he or she complies with its conditions, such as seeking work. Therefore, the issue of social exclusion does not arise.

Benefit Entitlement (30 Nov 1999)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, social exclusion is a multi-layered problem. To quote the words of the Prime Minister, it is, "A short-hand label for what can happen when individuals or areas suffer from a contribution of linked problems--such as unemployment, poor skills, low incomes, poor housing, high crime environments, bad health and family breakdown"; in other words, social exclusion is "joined-up problems".

Benefit Entitlement (30 Nov 1999)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, the Government do not wish to disentitle anyone from benefit to which he or she is entitled. The Government seek compliance. For example, we want young people to work with personal advisers to obtain and hold down a reasonable job. We want lone parents to co-operate with us in naming the father of the child so that the child gains in maintenance. We want offenders to observe their...

Benefit Entitlement (30 Nov 1999)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, perhaps I may give an example. Jobseeker's allowance is a benefit for those who are unemployed. The entitlement to that benefit is matched by a concomitant responsibility to seek and hold down a job. If someone can sign on for benefit, he or she can come in simultaneously for an interview. That is what we seek to do. It is no kindness never to allow young people of 18 or 19 to come...

Benefit Entitlement (30 Nov 1999)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, hardly. For example, those who will not be eligible for incapacity benefit will be disqualified only because they already enjoy a healthy occupational pension of £12,000, £14,000 or more. As a result, I hardly think that they would fit the definition of the noble Lord, or anyone else, of socially excluded.

Benefit Entitlement (30 Nov 1999)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, it is the Government's policy that no one should be inadvertently excluded. I share the position of the right reverend Prelate on that. Having said that, the entitlement to a benefit is matched by a responsibility for observing the conditions that go with it--for example, the willingness to seek work. The right reverend Prelate is right. I am sure that for too long too many...

Lone Parents: New Deal Interviews (1 Dec 1999)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, letters inviting lone parents to contact a personal adviser are currently sent to those whose youngest child is over five. The Government have announced that invitation letters will also be sent to lone parents with three and four year-olds. The New Deal for Lone Parents is a voluntary programme. Lone parents are not pressured into looking for work, but many realise that measures...

Lone Parents: New Deal Interviews (1 Dec 1999)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: Yes, my Lords. On the first part of the supplementary question, about 44 per cent of young lone parents who come forward and who come on to the New Deal have children under the age of five. We are responding to that pressure. The noble Lord is right as regards the second part of the question. I was happy to be present at the launch of the National Parenting Institute yesterday. Research shows...

Lone Parents: New Deal Interviews (1 Dec 1999)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, the lone parents on the New Deal tell us that the New Deal has turned their life around. Of those who come for interview, about 85 to 90 per cent join the programme. One quarter of those have already gone into unsubsidised jobs; others are on training programmes. New lone parents tell us that the New Deal matches their needs. I suggest to the noble Lord that his question is a bit...

Lone Parents: New Deal Interviews (1 Dec 1999)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, any lone parent who comes into the New Deal not only has a personal adviser but access to training up to NVQ1 and NVQ2. NVQ2 is approximately equivalent to A-level. While they are in the New Deal and receive training across local government they are entitled to free child care and access to those courses. Therefore, the City of Westminster scheme is broadly replicated across the country.

Children (Leaving Care) Bill [H.L.] (7 Dec 1999)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, I nodded to indicate that we had heard the noble Lord. We always listen attentively because we always have a lot to learn from him.

Written Answers — House of Lords: Single Room Rent Restriction (11 Jan 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: We are unable to estimate with any accuracy the cost of abolishing the single room rent restriction. There is insufficient quantitative information on how this group responded to the change and without this information we cannot estimate the behavioural effects of reversing the change.

Written Answers — House of Lords: Child Support Agency: Administrative Costs (11 Jan 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: The administration of the Child Support Agency is a matter for the Chief Executive, Mrs Faith Boardman. She will write to the noble Earl. Letter from the Chief Executive of the Child Support Agency, Mrs Faith Boardman, dated 5 January 2000. I am replying to your Parliamentary Question to Her Majesty's Government about the administrative costs of the Child Support Agency. Our cash allocation...


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