Results 41–60 of 313 for speaker:Lord Sutherland of Houndwood

Housing (12 May 2004)

Lord Sutherland of Houndwood: My Lords, I thank the noble Lord, Lord Lucas, for giving us the opportunity to debate these immensely important issues. It is an appropriate tribute to Kate Barker and her colleagues that we are assembled to spend time on a report that sheds light on many of the complex issues that surround this area. I want to make four points in the debate. The four points may seem disparate but in fact...

Higher Education Bill (13 May 2004)

Lord Sutherland of Houndwood: There are undercurrents in this discussion. Having been vice-chancellor of both London and Edinburgh Universities I would not want to be caught in the undercurrents of comparing Scottish and English higher education—a dangerous position to be in. Nonetheless, there is a clear issue here. I make one point about the Scottish expansion, which is that it was significantly aided by the work of...

Higher Education Bill (13 May 2004)

Lord Sutherland of Houndwood: I cannot support these amendments because I fear that they would leave the universities in the worst possible position: no sign of extra cash coming down the system that is clear and unambiguous and, at the same time, an extra layer of regulation and bureaucracy. Tying those two together causes real difficulty.

Higher Education Bill (13 May 2004)

Lord Sutherland of Houndwood: I want to add my voice to those who say that the uncertainty over the cross-border traffic is worrying. Had that been resolved in a much clearer fashion, perhaps I could have understood the role that those representing Scottish constituencies took in the debate in the other place, but it had not happened, so they were voting blind. I was almost distracted from this point by the thought of...

Higher Education Bill (13 May 2004)

Lord Sutherland of Houndwood: I apologise for raising the question of sleepers.

Higher Education Bill (17 May 2004)

Lord Sutherland of Houndwood: I, too, regret that I cannot support the amendment. I see its point and merit. I want to stress a point made by the noble Lord, Lord Forsyth, and the noble Baroness, Lady Warwick—the issue of scrutiny. HEFCE does not hold its meetings in public. I declare that I was a member of HEFCE and I have the highest regard for the rigour with which discussions take place. But to put OFFA under the...

Higher Education Bill (17 May 2004)

Lord Sutherland of Houndwood: I apologise for speaking again on the topic, but the arguments put forward in favour of the amendment are very good arguments for having no OFFA at all. If that were the proposal, I would be with it. To put OFFA under HEFCE does not in any way guarantee that there will not be mission creep, additional bureaucracy imposed on universities, or additional costs for universities. Consider, for...

Higher Education Bill (17 May 2004)

Lord Sutherland of Houndwood: I support Amendment No. 62 and, consequentially, Amendments Nos. 64 and 65. To extend the metaphor that the noble Baroness, Lady Sharp, developed with great skill, teeth are here, and if Jaws is alive and well in the cool water of academe, perhaps drawing some teeth is an important consequent. If we are to have a regulator, we must make two consequential decisions that are absolutely...

Higher Education Bill (17 May 2004)

Lord Sutherland of Houndwood: I would like to think that the last sentence of the comments of the noble Lord, Lord Dearing, would apply. But I want to put on the record the resistance some of us have to OFFA. I understand, and it has effectively been said, that there is a package there, but there is another way of doing it which will allow regulation in a much more straightforward way. If universities are told simply that...

Higher Education Bill (17 May 2004)

Lord Sutherland of Houndwood: It is in the interests of the universities and the national system that we get better at producing this information. It is clearly not adequate at the moment, for all the reasons that we have heard, but this seems a sensible way in which to tackle the problem—although early reports would have to have a very large health warning on them.

Higher Education Bill (17 May 2004)

Lord Sutherland of Houndwood: I support the amendment not only for the reasons given by the noble Baroness, Lady Perry, but also because I believe that the director of OFFA should be able to give reasons for either accepting or rejecting views—plural—expressed in Parliament.

Higher Education Bill (17 May 2004)

Lord Sutherland of Houndwood: I too support the amendment. I was here in 1992, but up in the gallery. However, when I was younger I did not have the stamina to listen to seven-hour debates. Perhaps that comes with maturity as one accepts a place in the House. I prefer this amendment to later versions because it picks out the content of academic freedom in this context: course content, programmes of research, appointment...

House again in Committee on Clause 30. (17 May 2004)

Lord Sutherland of Houndwood: I support all that my colleague, the noble Baroness, Lady Perry, has said. I underline also the point that she made about subsection (2)(a), which is the subject of Amendment No. 80A. I certainly agree with that. I simply stress the importance of looking at the universities' overall strategic plan. We have been drilled, dragooned, cajoled, steered and pushed towards having overall strategic...

Higher Education Bill (25 May 2004)

Lord Sutherland of Houndwood: I support the amendment. My experience of student life is that very often when academic problems present themselves behind them lie financial problems. That certainly is the case for some of the poorer students but not only those students. It makes good sense to tackle the matter as early in the system as possible.

Higher Education Bill (25 May 2004)

Lord Sutherland of Houndwood: I speak in support of the amendment but note that Amendment No. 103, tabled in my name, has been grouped with this one and I am quite content to speak to that too. I support Amendment No. 99A for two reasons, which have been clearly articulated. First, as has been said many times in the debate on the Bill in both places, not all is in the control of universities. That principle being...

Higher Education Bill (25 May 2004)

Lord Sutherland of Houndwood: The difference between the RAE and the office and director of OFFA is that the director of OFFA has the capacity to take money from universities already legitimately earned or received by them through the process approved by the funding council. The RAE allocates additional cash on a basis that even its most ardent supporters—and, on the whole, I support it—would not say was objectively...

Higher Education Bill (25 May 2004)

Lord Sutherland of Houndwood: My Lords—

Higher Education Bill (25 May 2004)

Lord Sutherland of Houndwood: had given notice of his intention to move Amendment No. 103: After Clause 35, insert the following new clause— "RIGHT OF APPEAL (1) There will be a right of appeal against the decision of the Director of Fair Access to Higher Education. (2) The appeal and any supporting evidence must be submitted within twelve weeks of notification of the governing body. (3) The appeal will be heard by a...

Higher Education Bill (25 May 2004)

Lord Sutherland of Houndwood: The matter has clearly been debated fully. I appreciate the comments of noble Lords who spoke in the debate, and I appreciate their interest in the issues, which I still think are fundamental, and particularly the points raised by my noble friend Lord MacGregor. I thank the Minister for her detailed account of the difficulties. I realised that there were practical problems, which is why I...

Higher Education Bill (8 Jun 2004)

Lord Sutherland of Houndwood: My Lords I, too, congratulate the noble Lord, Lord Phillips, on the subtlety of the amendment. It is important that an amendment of this kind—I would happily support this one or that tabled by my noble friend Lady O'Neill—is included in the Bill. The reason is that the Bill is significantly drafted to provide additional funds to universities and the record is clear; the money can begin to...


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