Results 121–140 of 453 for speaker:Lord Archer of Sandwell

Civil Contingencies Bill (9 Nov 2004)

Lord Archer of Sandwell: My Lords, I hope that I am not cast in the role Eeyore. I had hoped to be able to lavish praise on the Government for the two amendments standing in the name of my noble friend. I doubt that we could have hoped for a more robust form of draftmanship. The various eventualities for which it may be necessary to plan and the differing voluntary organisations which it may be reasonable to consult...

Civil Contingencies Bill (9 Nov 2004)

Lord Archer of Sandwell: My Lords, as those drafts have been shared with those most concerned, would the Minister consider sharing them with Members of your Lordships' House?

Civil Contingencies Bill (21 Oct 2004)

Lord Archer of Sandwell: I am most grateful to the noble Baroness for giving way. She has made a point more than once about what appears to be an inconsistency between two sets of rights. During the course of the day she has stoutly asserted a number of rights which she says should be protected in the Bill. If protection were introduced for them, would she be content that protection for this right, too, should remain...

Civil Contingencies Bill (21 Oct 2004)

Lord Archer of Sandwell: Does my noble friend agree that, normally, legislation that is likely to prove highly controversial ought not to be used to deal with an emergency?

Middle East Peace Process (21 Oct 2004)

Lord Archer of Sandwell: My Lords, does my noble friend agree that, although we do not all recognise Mr Sharon as a kindred spirit, he has shown great political courage in proposing and persisting with the disengagement plan, despite opposition in his own party, problems with the Knesset and a distinct lack of enthusiasm from Mr Arafat? Should we not strengthen his arm so far as we can and encourage him in well doing?

Civil Contingencies Bill (21 Oct 2004)

Lord Archer of Sandwell: moved Amendment No. 100: Page 14, line 15, at end insert "necessary"

Civil Contingencies Bill (21 Oct 2004)

Lord Archer of Sandwell: Following our more passionate debates earlier in the week, this promises to be rather a tranquil episode—at least by the time the Chamber has emptied. These exploratory amendments are intended to provide my noble friend with an opportunity to explain to me that I am guilty of a misunderstanding. They relate to what appears to be a logical eccentricity in the Bill. At Second Reading, I...

Civil Contingencies Bill (21 Oct 2004)

Lord Archer of Sandwell: I am grateful for noble Lords' contributions. I appreciate that those who prepared my noble friend's brief had not had the opportunity of hearing what I said a few moments ago. Most unusually for my noble friend, she did not address the point that I was making. I was not suggesting that the Government were trying to slip something past us to produce a great increment in their power; I was...

Civil Contingencies Bill (21 Oct 2004)

Lord Archer of Sandwell: Not for the first time—if I may say this within the rules of order—I congratulate the noble Lord, Lord Elton. He has achieved with a degree of elegance what we have all been searching for. I say that for two reasons. First, normally brevity is the soul of good draftmanship and the fewer words the better; secondly, it solves the problem that I attempted to raise under Amendment No. 100....

Civil Contingencies Bill (21 Oct 2004)

Lord Archer of Sandwell: I hope that my Amendment No. 110 still belongs to the group. Had the situation been otherwise, I am not sure that it would have belonged to the group at all, as perhaps it should not logically be grouped with the noble Baroness's amendment. I hope that I will not introduce an irrelevant note in speaking to Amendment No. 110. My point is that we do not really need to discuss the limits on...

Civil Contingencies Bill (21 Oct 2004)

Lord Archer of Sandwell: I am grateful to my noble friend for giving way. If these emergencies are so unpredictable that we cannot make a list of what is required to be done, why make half a list in Clause 22?

Civil Contingencies Bill (21 Oct 2004)

Lord Archer of Sandwell: My noble friend has been extremely patient, and I am most grateful to her for giving way. Let us take the example given by the noble Lord, Lord Avebury. Does she agree that it really is not acceptable that the ignorance of the offender goes to the mitigation of sentence? It clearly ought to be a defence, so that they do not commit an offence at all.

Civil Contingencies Bill (21 Oct 2004)

Lord Archer of Sandwell: I may be hindering rather than assisting my noble friend but she may remember that the Joint Committee recommended that regulations should be published and in their response the Government said that there might be situations where it was not wise to do that. It is not wholly clear whether they are talking about draft regulations or regulations but that is the subject of a later amendment.

Civil Contingencies Bill (19 Oct 2004)

Lord Archer of Sandwell: I think that we debated Amendment No. 94 with Amendment No. 86C.

Civil Contingencies Bill (19 Oct 2004)

Lord Archer of Sandwell: At the risk of being tiresome, Amendment No. 94 has already been debated.

Civil Contingencies Bill (19 Oct 2004)

Lord Archer of Sandwell: My amendment, Amendment No. 97A, refers only to part of Amendment No. 97. That is not because I disagree with the amendment moved by the noble Baroness, Lady Buscombe; I did not see it when I tabled mine or, at least, I did not notice it. I shall confine my comments to subsection (5). Clause 21, which the Committee has just been debating, specifies the conditions that must be satisfied before...

Civil Contingencies Bill (19 Oct 2004)

Lord Archer of Sandwell: I am grateful to my noble friend for giving way. Up to this point, I have listened carefully to her comments, which I have found persuasive. But if she is saying that a situation may change in 50 years so that the legislation may become out of date, would one not need a clause such as this in every statute that had ever been passed?

Civil Contingencies Bill (19 Oct 2004)

Lord Archer of Sandwell: I seem to recollect being told as a student that, in constitutional theory, there is only one Secretary of State. It is normal draftsmanship to refer to "the Secretary of State", without specifying which Secretary of State.

Iraq: Legality of Conflict (19 Oct 2004)

Lord Archer of Sandwell: My Lords, can my noble friend confirm that the reason given to Parliament to justify the invasion was that the Security Council in Resolution 1441 had authorised military action? Does she agree that, whatever else may have been the case, at the time of the invasion the Security Council clearly was not prepared to authorise it?

Civil Contingencies Bill (14 Oct 2004)

Lord Archer of Sandwell: At a later stage, we will be debating questions arising out of Ministers' thought processes, and we are all interested in those. I think there is a problem which the noble Baroness attempted to face but from which, in the end, she backed away. By definition, we are dealing with a situation where urgency is written right through it—where the whole question is how to get something done...


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