Results 221–240 of 290 for speaker:Lord Morgan

Local Government and Regional Assemblies (16 Jun 2004)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, I am sorry to interrupt the noble Lord, but he was referring to my argument which he misunderstood. The naivety was on his side. My view was that devolution and regionalisation is a cumulative process. Just as we have a process of change and are on the cusp of change in Wales, I imagine that in future we shall be on the cusp of change in the English regions also. It will take a long...

Higher Education Bill (8 Jun 2004)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, I spoke on this issue before. Again, perhaps I may warmly congratulate the two noble Lords who have spoken on the principle of what has been raised. There is no question but that the low level of academic stipend has been an extraordinary national scandal for a very long time; in fact, since 1979–80. These are very talented people who, commonly and necessarily, because they do...

Children Bill [HL] (20 May 2004)

Lord Morgan: I would like to declare my total disagreement with the views that we have just heard, and to support the amendment very strongly. I am also a member of the alliance to which the noble Baroness, Lady Finlay, referred. It has shown that the present law condones violence. It legalises assault on children in a way that does not happen in relation to adults. In fact, the original legislation...

International Cricket (11 May 2004)

Lord Morgan: My Lord, does my noble friend perhaps recall that in 1970 a Labour Home Secretary, Lord Callaghan, told the MCC that the South Africans should not tour, and that he took that view not on moral grounds but on grounds of disorder and danger to life and property, including the life and property of the cricketers concerned? Is that a possible way forward?

Higher Education Bill (10 May 2004)

Lord Morgan: I would hope that the amendment of the noble Lord, Lord Renfrew of Kaimsthorn, is, as he says, superfluous. It is an enormously worthy cause. I am a fellow of the British Academy, so—if I have to—I declare a kind of interest. First, the value of these British schools abroad goes far beyond the purely academic. They have been an enormous factor in establishing a British cultural presence,...

Higher Education Bill (10 May 2004)

Lord Morgan: These amendments are unnecessary. I hope that the Government will not accept them. It seems to me that they are not in place of the Arts and Humanities Research Council, but a supplement to it. I can think of all kinds of matters in the humanities—for example, the history of architecture—where research has been fostered directly by departments. I also hope that advisory bodies will be...

Higher Education Bill (10 May 2004)

Lord Morgan: The amendment—

Higher Education Bill (10 May 2004)

Lord Morgan: I would like to confine myself rather narrowly to Amendment No. 11. This may seem parochial and pedestrian, but my friend, the noble Lord, Lord Roberts, built up a mighty edifice of Welsh eloquence about this and ranged over practically the whole of the Bill. He succeeded in eliciting my disagreement the more he went on. The point he makes concerns something that is constitutionally improper....

Higher Education Bill (10 May 2004)

Lord Morgan: I too strongly support the proposed Arts and Humanities Research Council and I am sorry that, due to circumstances beyond my control, I was not able to express that support at Second Reading. I should declare an interest as one who has spent the past 48 years doing research in the arts and humanities, and not much else. So I warmly endorse what was said by my noble friend Lady Warwick. I do...

Higher Education Bill (10 May 2004)

Lord Morgan: I entirely endorse what the noble Lord, Lord Dearing, has said. However, the noble Lord is to be congratulated on raising the matter of academic salaries, which have been a scandal in public life for many decades. We have rehearsed the points in previous debates. The starting salaries are very low; the basic spine is very long; it takes a long time to receive a decent stipend; the people who...

Higher Education Bill (10 May 2004)

Lord Morgan: My noble friend makes some very fair points but does she not agree that the problem is immense? We are dealing with not a temporary irregularity in pay comparability but a backlog of 20 or 25 years. That is the problem of the new funding arrangements.

Constitutional Reform Bill [HL] (8 Mar 2004)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, as a non-lawyer I intervene with diffidence in this debate. It is a topic on which I have never previously pronounced. I intervene with less diffidence as a historian, in view of the extraordinarily bad history that we have heard at various times during the past few hours. I take the criticism seriously, particularly that of the noble Lord, Lord Woolf, in his lecture, particularly...

Film Production Tax Relief (4 Mar 2004)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, does my noble friend agree that in fact the Treasury need not be on the defensive in this situation at all? In fact it should be congratulated on stopping widespread abuse and a proper attempt to aid the film industry. There is nothing to apologise for.

Address in Reply to Her Majesty's Most Gracious Speech (2 Dec 2003)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, I am sorry to interrupt the noble Lord, but he misrepresents the case. The power of the Lords is not confined to alleged constitutional laws; it applies to all laws—it could apply to fox hunting. His view is incorrectly stated.

Address in Reply to Her Majesty's Most Gracious Speech (2 Dec 2003)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, as A J P Taylor used to say, it is "a curious twist" that the most controversial aspect of the Address should be a debate on constitutional matters. In the past they were regarded as an elite subject that caused people to leave the House in large numbers. However, they constitute perhaps the most radical change that the Government have introduced. In his presence I pay very great...

Iraq: Post-conflict Reconstruction (12 Nov 2003)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, the noble Baroness, Lady Northover, asked about the economic restructuring of Iraq, which is surely a major cause of the violence in that country. What is happening is illegal. As the Attorney-General advised the Prime Minister last March, it is illegal to have economic reconstruction involving the privatisation of Iraqi assets and the taking over of Iraqi companies against the will...

Higher Education: Tuition Fees (6 Nov 2003)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, can my noble friend say whether the needs of mature students will be considered? They loom very large; they number perhaps a third of the student body of some universities. Does my noble friend agree that they have been casualties of recent policies and tend to be excluded in discussions on this matter?

Written Answers — House of Lords: Bermuda: Constitution (6 Nov 2003)

Lord Morgan: asked Her Majesty's Government: Whether progress has been made in consulting the people of Bermuda on the procedures to be adopted for considering future proposals for amending Bermuda's constitution.

Written Answers — House of Lords: Advisory Board on Restricted Patients (16 Sep 2003)

Lord Morgan: asked Her Majesty's Government: What plans they have regarding the future of the Home Secretary's Advisory Board on Restricted Patients.

Written Answers — House of Lords: Neighbourhood Renewal Fund (16 Sep 2003)

Lord Morgan: asked Her Majesty's Government: Which areas are supported by the recently announced funding package of £175 million Neighbourhood Renewal Fund resources for 2004–05 and 2005–06.


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