Results 201–220 of 290 for speaker:Lord Morgan

Tributes to the late Lord Callaghan of Cardiff (4 Apr 2005)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, I should briefly like to say a few words, because I had the privilege of writing Lord Callaghan's autobiography—

Tributes to the late Lord Callaghan of Cardiff (4 Apr 2005)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, I should have said, biography. It occupied some eight years of my life, and it was the most interesting thing that I have ever done. It was a biography, not an autobiography. He was a strong man to talk to and a tough man. If someone has written their autobiography, which is, no doubt, what I had in my mind, you have to jolt or unsettle them in some way and that could be quite...

Higher Education (Northern Ireland) Order 2005 (22 Mar 2005)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, I know nothing of Northern Ireland and we have had an authoritative statement from the noble Lord, Lord Smith of Clifton, about the circumstances there. My only reason for intervening is that we are veering into the general issue of whether top-up fees are helpful or disastrous for universities. In the rest of the United Kingdom, Scotland is still considering them, but Wales is...

Constitutional Reform Bill [HL] (21 Mar 2005)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, I want briefly to support, as I did last week, what the noble and learned Lord the Lord Chancellor has said, and I hope that your Lordships' House will not insist on its amendments. It was quite different in the case of the Prevention of Terrorism Bill. Then, a very large majority against the Bill was drawn from all our Benches, including myself, and I think that it was appropriate...

Constitutional Reform Bill [HL] (21 Mar 2005)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, I am not familiar with what I am sure is the noble Viscount's extremely distinguished legal background, but it has been said repeatedly in this debate that the Lord Chancellor should be someone at the end of his career. That is the point that I was addressing, and I think appropriately so. Further, it has been said that, because there are very few lawyers in the House of...

Constitutional Reform Bill [HL] (15 Mar 2005)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, I would like to speak strongly in support of what my noble and learned friend the Lord Chancellor said. I do so with the confidence of a non-lawyer, who tend to be unrepresented in these discussions. Many of the arguments that we have heard, which were powerfully put and which I respect, are based on the way things have been; that is the way it has been for generation after...

Constitutional Reform Bill [HL] (15 Mar 2005)

Lord Morgan: I meant billion, my Lords—forgive me. I am not numerate, but £3 billion was what I meant to say. That is a very large budget, with lots of noughts at the end—too many for me. It clearly should be defended and justified by an accountable Minister in the House of Commons. It is very important that somebody like the Lord Chancellor should be an open forum, accountable to Members of...

Constitutional Reform Bill [HL] (15 Mar 2005)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, is it not in fact a principle that we observe in other areas of life? In academic life, for example, and no doubt in other professional areas, you seek to strike a balance between people who have the ability to do the job and other kinds of circumstances, including the social background, the context and the needs. It is not necessarily so unique a problem.

Devolution: Wales (1 Mar 2005)

Lord Morgan: My Lords—

Devolution: Wales (1 Mar 2005)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, does my noble friend recall that the Richard commission observed that the present legislative process for Wales is very unsatisfactory, with Welsh legislation depending on the whim of Ministers and civil servants in London? Would he also agree that the Welsh people have shown enormous gratitude to the Government for giving devolution to Wales, in contrast to the Tory Party in Wales,...

Extradition to US (6 Dec 2004)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, my noble friend says frequently that it is a tradition of this country that we should have confidentiality and secrecy in discussing these matters. We have also heard that we are awaiting a full public discussion in the United States. Why should this country be so extraordinarily supine in having a public discussion about an international treaty? Is that not a major feature of the...

Commons Amendment (10 Nov 2004)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, we all want to get this Bill on to the statute book in good time and I am anxious to help it on its way. But I agree very much with the sentiments put forward by the noble Lord, Lord Thomas. If I recall correctly, I think that we spoke in somewhat similar terms in the debate on the Children's Commissioner for Wales three or so years ago. This is another example of the Government...

Commons Amendment (10 Nov 2004)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, I hope that something may be said from these Benches. I shall speak very briefly, because this is a topic that generates many speeches. I am concerned, as someone who sits on these Benches, at the surrenders made in the House of Commons which have significantly weakened aspects of the Bill, particularly the role of the commissioner. I wish to make two points. First, I think that the...

Commons Amendment (10 Nov 2004)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, no.

Constitution (15 Sep 2004)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, in the allocated three minutes, I shall endeavour to make three points. I shall do so briefly because I believe that other noble Lords, particularly on the Liberal Democrat Benches, will raise them. First, the Government's admirable constitutional reforms nevertheless call for a further move towards written safeguards. I shall mention briefly devolution. The Constitution Committee,...

Dictionary of National Biography (10 Sep 2004)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, like all other speakers, I thank the noble Lord, Lord Baker, very much for inaugurating this discussion. Like, I suspect, a number of other speakers, I declare an interest as a contributor of 20-odd people including one former Prime Minister on whom I wrote 23,000 words. I gather that anonymity is to be preserved, but I can give noble Lords a clue by saying that the Prime Minister...

Dictionary of National Biography (10 Sep 2004)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, on a point of information, it was Richard III.

Dictionary of National Biography (10 Sep 2004)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, just to clear that up. I think that I am correct in saying that the Government provided £3 million and the noble Lord, Lord Quirk, said that the British Academy supplied the extra £1 million from other sources.

Higher Education Bill (22 Jun 2004)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, I declare an interest as a former vice-chancellor of the University of Wales and of Aberystwyth. "Give me liberty or give me death", is a famous phrase from the American Revolution. This seems to be a case of "Give me liberty or give me devolution". As Tom Paine observed, I am for liberty. Although I sit on these Benches, I am not a politician; I am a life-long academic and I have...

Local Government and Regional Assemblies (16 Jun 2004)

Lord Morgan: My Lords, I thank the noble Lord, Lord McNally, for initiating this debate. It is a great privilege to be number two in the batting order, which I used to be in cricket but have not hitherto been in the House. But the Benches around me indicated the passionate interest that the Labour Party takes in these matters. So that might account for my presence. I speak for two reasons. First, the...


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