Results 121–140 of 3248 for speaker:Ben Wallace

Written Answers — Home Office: Counter-terrorism (16 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: The Home Office intends to publish Prevent and Channel data in the near future. Since 2012, over 1,000 individuals have been provided with support.

Written Answers — Home Office: Home Office: Chief Scientific Advisers (12 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: Home Office Ministers and The Home Secretary met with the previous Chief Scientific Advisor 7 times in the last twelve months. However, the new Chief Scientific Adviser Prof John Aston took up post on 4th September and will be meeting with Ministers shortly.

Written Answers — Home Office: Counter-terrorism (12 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: I refer the Honourable Member to the answer I gave on 11 October 2017 to UIN 105696.

Written Answers — Home Office: Counter-terrorism (11 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: Allegations under the Prevention of Terrorism Act 2005 are not held on an individual’s record on the Police National Computer.

Written Answers — Home Office: Cryptocurrencies: Crime (10 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: In the National Strategic Assessment published by the National Crime Agency (NCA) in 2017, the NCA assessed that cryptocurrencies will remain an enabler for online criminality because of their accessibility, perceived anonymity, speed of cross-border payments and irreversible payment mechanism. http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/807-natio...

Written Answers — Home Office: Home Office: Cybercrime (9 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: The policy set out in paragraph 5.3.6 of the National Cyber Security Strategy applies to everyone employed by the Home Office, including contractors. The Home Office is committed to ensuring that contractors and their staff have a sound awareness of cyber risk matters and they take all necessary safeguards to protect the department’s information. Cyber security awareness, the need...

Written Answers — Home Office: Radicalism: Young People (9 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: Where radicalised young people present a threat to national security, that threat is managed by MI5 and the Police. There are a range of powers and tools available to the police and security services to do this. The Government keeps these powers under constant review.

Written Answers — Home Office: Cybercrime (9 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: The Home Office regularly engages with law enforcement bodies to review cyber crime-related legislation in order to ensure that it keeps pace with evolving threats. Law enforcement agencies currently can and do work in close partnership with service providers to remove illegal content online. The Home Office is not aware of any MLA requests to seize domain names and IP addresses used to...

Written Answers — Home Office: Home Office: Scientific Advisers (9 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: My Chief Scientific Adviser, Prof. John Aston, ensures that departmental policies are informed by the best science and engineering evidence and advice by offering independent advice directly to ministers and officials and working together with the cross Government Chief Scientific Advisers’ network to advise on issues that cut across government. Independent Scientific Advice is also...

Written Answers — Home Office: Islamic State: British Nationals Abroad (9 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: Approximately 850 UK linked individuals of national security concern have travelled to engage with the Syrian conflict. We estimate that just under half have returned and approximately 15% are now dead. This number includes all those of national security concern, not just those affiliated with Daesh. Everyone who returns from taking part in the conflict in Syria or Iraq must expect to be...

Written Answers — Home Office: Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation (9 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: I refer the Hon. Member to the answer I gave on the 19th September 2017, UIN 10158.

Written Answers — Home Office: Terrorism (22 Sep 2017)

Ben Wallace: Following referrals from the Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU), social media providers have removed 280,000 pieces of illegal terrorist material since February 2010. Between 11 May 2010 and 31 December 2015, the Government excluded 181 people from the United Kingdom, including 69 exclusions on national security grounds. There were 26 exclusions made between 1 January 2015 and...

Written Answers — Home Office: Home Office: Behavioural Insights Team (19 Sep 2017)

Ben Wallace: Since 2014 the Home Office have worked with the Behavioural Insights Team on a number of policy evaluations across the department.

Written Answers — Home Office: Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation (19 Sep 2017)

Ben Wallace: On 4 June 2017 the Prime Minister announced that the Government would review the UK’s counter-terrorism strategy to make sure the police and security services have all the powers and capabilities they need to keep our country safe. This review is ongoing.

Written Answers — Home Office: Hezbollah (15 Sep 2017)

Ben Wallace: I refer my Hon. Friend to the answer given to the Hon. Member for East Renfrewshire on 28 June 2017, UIN 556.

Written Answers — Home Office: National Security (13 Sep 2017)

Ben Wallace: A future partnership between the UK and EU on security and law enforcement issues is in the interests of both sides and we approach negotiations anticipating success. We do not want or expect a no deal outcome. However, a responsible government should prepare for all potential outcomes. That is exactly what we are doing across the whole of Government. The Home Office leads on EU Exit...

Written Answers — Home Office: Animal Experiments (12 Sep 2017)

Ben Wallace: The Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 requires licensees to apply the 3Rs (Replacement, Reduction, Refinement) at all times, including when breeding genetically altered animals. The Animals in Science Regulation Unit has developed a genetically altered animal assessment framework to support the delivery of the 3Rs through efficient breeding. The framework was designed specifically for...

Written Answers — Home Office: Animal Experiments: Primates (12 Sep 2017)

Ben Wallace: The numbers of non-human primates used each year depends on a number of factors, including the programmes of work and available funding. In 2016 there were 125 new world monkeys, used in basic research: 49 for nervous system; and, 76 for multisystemic research. In the same year, 72 new world monkeys were used for translational and applied research: 24 for human nervous and mental disorders;...

Written Answers — Home Office: Animal Experiments: Dogs (12 Sep 2017)

Ben Wallace: Breeds of dogs reported include Beagles, Labrador Retriever, Yorkshire Terrier, Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen and Jack Russell Terrier. These animals were used in nutrition and dentistry studies, the investigation of physiology, natural disease and its prevention.

Written Answers — Home Office: Animal Experiments: Dogs (12 Sep 2017)

Ben Wallace: The published annual statistics of animals used under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 (ASPA) in Great Britain show that in 2016 less than 0.1% of animals used in research in Great Britain are dogs. Dogs are primarily used in procedures for regulatory testing. They are also used in other procedures such as nutritional studies and to better understand naturally occurring diseases...


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