Results 1–20 of 3144 for speaker:Ben Wallace

Written Answers — Home Office: Terrorism (20 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: The Home Office publishes data on the number of persons charged, prosecuted and convicted, following an arrest for a terrorism-related offence, in the quarterly ‘Operation of police powers under the Terrorism Act 2000 and subsequent legislation’ statistical release. Data, broken down by the legislation under which an individual is charged/prosecuted/convicted, are available from...

Written Answers — Home Office: Crime: Finance (19 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: Section 13 of the Criminal Finances Act allows for civil recovery to be undertaken in cases in relation to property connected with gross human rights abuse or violations. It expands the definition of 'unlawful conduct' within Part 5 of POCA to include conduct by a public official that constitutes gross human rights abuse or violations (defined as torture or inhuman, cruel or degrading...

Written Answers — Home Office: Terrorism: Wolverhampton (17 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: The Home Office does not hold the information requested. The Home Office publishes data on the number of persons arrested and charged for a terrorism-related offences in Great Britain. From these data, we cannot identify the location of where arrests for terrorism-related offences occurred. The data that the Home Office does hold can be found in the quarterly ‘Operation of police powers...

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Asset Recovery Programme (16 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: Since 2010, we have recovered £1.4 billion under the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002. The Criminal Finances Act 2017 provides important new powers to improve the asset recovery system, such as unexplained wealth orders and the forfeiture of bank accounts. The Government are also implementing the recommendations of a 2016 Public Accounts Committee report, and our asset recovery action plan...

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Asset Recovery Programme (16 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: I can give my hon. Friend that assurance. We are determined that unexplained wealth orders should be used not only by the NCA but by broader law enforcement to ensure that people have to prove where they got their wealth. Using that reverse burden of proof makes sure that we progress to taking an asset if a criminal’s wealth is unexplained and might have resulted from criminality.

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Asset Recovery Programme (16 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: I totally agree with the right hon. Gentleman. It is exactly our goal to keep all those measures, but there is another party on the other side of the negotiating table. We would like to keep those measures, and we will ask for that—perhaps he could ask them, too—and let us hope they give it to us.

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Online Radicalisation (16 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: The Government have been clear that there should be no safe space online for terrorists and their supporters to radicalise, recruit, incite or inspire. We are working closely with the industry, including through the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism, to encourage it to develop innovative solutions to tackle online radicalisation.

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Online Radicalisation (16 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: My hon. Friend is right. Internet companies could do more with their technology. They could do much more to recognise that they have a responsibility for much of the stuff that is hosted on their sites and they could do more to take it down. That is why the United Kingdom Government, through the Global Internet Forum, are taking the lead in dealing with the issue. The Home Secretary was only...

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Online Radicalisation (16 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: The hon. Gentleman misses the point. The authority placing the contract will, of course, verify the conditions of the contract before signing it. Whether we put it together and say, “We’ve got 1,000”, is slightly the second point. The main issue is whether it is properly done. On top of that, the UK Government as a whole invest £1.9 billion into the national...

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Topical Questions (16 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: There is no evidence that that has happened. Of course, people think that it probably will happen, but at the moment the figures do not match the theory. When anyone returns about whom we have a suspicion that they have been fighting for any group or committed a crime overseas, they can expect to be arrested and questioned by the appropriate police forces. If there is evidence, we will...

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Topical Questions (16 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: The hon. Lady makes the valid point that a number of shooting crimes are being committed at the moment. That is why the Government have increased funding to police and specialist policing by £32 million for armed uplift to ensure that we have trained officers on the ground to deal with such threats, and that when we go after criminals who are armed, the police are protected and have the...

Written Answers — Home Office: Cybercrime (16 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: At the end of the 2016/2017 reporting period for Cyber Aware an estimated 11 million adults and 1.4 million SMEs nationally claimed they were maintaining or intending to take up key cyber security behaviours as a result of Cyber Aware.* This is based on evidence from the National Cyber Security Tracker, a regular online panel survey of approximately 4,000 consumers and 1,200 SMEs, designed...

Written Answers — Home Office: Home Office: Behavioural Insights Team (16 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: The Behavioural Insights Team have been used to evaluate a number of sensitive policy areas across the Home Office. The policy areas include CT, wider security and the Policing sector.

Written Answers — Home Office: Personation (16 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: The Home Office do not hold the information requested. The use of another person’s identification details (or the use of false identification details), often referred to identity theft, is not itself an offence in law. Most instances of ‘Identity Theft’ come to light when victim’s details are used fraudulently to obtain goods, services or money using credit...

Written Answers — Home Office: Yvonne Fletcher (16 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: It would not be appropriate for the Home Office to discuss who is or is not a suspect in police investigations. The police are responsible for investigating criminal activity and determining who they consider to be suspects based on the evidence available.

Written Answers — Home Office: Counter-terrorism (16 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: Prevent is about safeguarding and supporting individuals to stop them from being drawn into terrorism. For individuals at risk, a multi-agency Channel programme exists to provide support which is voluntary and confidential. All referrals are carefully assessed to determine whether support is required. Following assessment, where it is concluded that support is not required through the Channel...

Written Answers — Home Office: Counter-terrorism (16 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: The Home Office intends to publish Prevent and Channel data in the near future. Since 2012, over 1,000 individuals have been provided with support.

Written Answers — Home Office: Home Office: Chief Scientific Advisers (12 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: Home Office Ministers and The Home Secretary met with the previous Chief Scientific Advisor 7 times in the last twelve months. However, the new Chief Scientific Adviser Prof John Aston took up post on 4th September and will be meeting with Ministers shortly.

Written Answers — Home Office: Counter-terrorism (12 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: I refer the Honourable Member to the answer I gave on 11 October 2017 to UIN 105696.

Written Answers — Home Office: Counter-terrorism (11 Oct 2017)

Ben Wallace: Allegations under the Prevention of Terrorism Act 2005 are not held on an individual’s record on the Police National Computer.


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