Results 161–180 of 11693 for speaker:James Brokenshire

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill (5 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: I am very conscious that I am now eating into the time of others who may wish to speak, so I will perhaps make some more progress, and we will see where we get to. The Investigatory Powers Commissioner, and his judicial commissioners, have all held high judicial office. The current IPC, Sir Brian Leveson, was most recently president of the Queen’s bench division and is entirely independent...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill (5 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: On that note, I give way to the Chair of the Home Affairs Committee.

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill (5 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: Obviously, we will have continued debate during the passage of the Bill. I believe that it provides strong oversight and governance, but I will continue to reflect. Judicial approval is an important safeguard for the operation of some of our investigatory powers; however, it is not the only way to provide a robust oversight of a power. It is important to recognise the context of this: we are...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill (5 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: I have responded to the latter point on the judgment that we have made in relation to this regime and how we believe that deep retrospective oversight is the right approach. This is distinct from phones or cameras. The use of CHIS requires deep expertise and close consideration of the personal qualities of that CHIS, which then enables very precise and safe tasking. There are different...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill (5 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: I will, for one final time, then I will wrap up.

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill (5 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: My hon. Friend highlights one particular aspect of the role of the Ministry of Defence. It is difficult to go into detail, but one further example I would give is that it might be necessary to access a proscribed organisation. As I say, the reporting regime is quite specific. Indeed, the oversight that is envisaged—and the oversight in the existing legislation—draws this out quite...

Written Answers — Home Office: Food: Standards (5 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act lists a range of public authorities who use Covert Human Intelligence Sources (CHIS) for general investigative purposes. The CHIS (Criminal Conduct) Bill restricts the number of public authorities able to authorise participation in criminal conduct to only those public authorities who have demonstrated a clear operational need for the tactic....

Written Answers — Home Office: Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill (5 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: A covert human intelligence source (CHIS) will never be given authority to commit any and all crime. All authorisations must be necessary and proportionate to the criminality they are seeking to prevent and the Authorising Officer must ensure that the level of criminality authorised must be at the lowest level of intrusion possible to achieve the aims of the operation. There are limits to the...

Written Answers — Home Office: Food Standards Agency (5 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: All authorisations are granted by an experienced and highly trained authorising officer who will ensure that the authorisation has strict parameters and that this is communicated to the ‘agent’ or CHIS. Authorising Officers receive robust training to ensure they understand necessity, proportionality and risk considerations. Public authorities each have in place their own training...

Written Answers — Home Office: Internet: Fraud (1 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: We know that people are spending more time online during this period and this can put them at greater risk of experiencing online harm. We have been working closely with technology companies, civil society and academia to understand and respond to the risks presented during this period. The department is committed to tackling all forms of crime, including those that exploit technology and the...

Written Answers — Home Office: Internet: Fraud (1 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: We know that people are spending more time online during this period and this can put them at greater risk of experiencing online harm. We have been working closely with technology companies, civil society and academia to understand and respond to the risks presented during this period. The department is committed to tackling all forms of crime, including those that exploit technology and the...

Written Answers — Home Office: Fraud: Pensions (1 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: The Government is committed to protecting people from pension scams and pursuing those who perpetrate these scams. In the period from 24 March 2020 to 25 September 2020, 166 reports of pension fraud were received by Action Fraud. The latest available data on Action Fraud reporting, covering the year to March 2020, can be found in table A5 of Crime in England and Wales on the ONS website,...

Written Answers — Home Office: Immigrants: Tibet (1 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: The Government takes the threat posed by hostile state activity extremely seriously, and seeks to protect the UK through strategies and structures that combine the UK’s diplomatic, intelligence and military capabilities, and its hard and soft power, to maximum effect. We act in concert with our allies, seeking to lead the West’s collective response to hybrid threats to our societies and...

Written Answers — Home Office: Action Fraud (1 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: As noted in the response to PQ 85113, the Home Office collects data on the number of fraud and Computer Misuse Act (CMA) cases reported to Action Fraud that have been recorded as criminal offences by the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB). The Home Office does not hold the information requested in questions 95751 and 95752. Reports submitted to Action Fraud are considered by the...

Written Answers — Home Office: Fraud (30 Sep 2020)

James Brokenshire: The decision on whether to investigate a crime rests solely with the police who will take into account available resources, the likely eventual outcome and other criminal cases already under investigation. Additionally, it is the duty of Police and Crime Commissioners to set out their priorities for their police force in a Police and Crime Plan. As such, there is no ringfenced resource...

Home Department: Online Hate Speech and Extremism (28 Sep 2020)

James Brokenshire: As a Government, we are committed to vigorously countering extremist ideology by making sure that every part of government is taking action. That includes ongoing conversations between the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and the Home Office on the implementation of the online harms framework to tackle hateful content. We will continue to work across government to challenge...

Home Department: Online Hate Speech and Extremism (28 Sep 2020)

James Brokenshire: The hon. Gentleman highlights an important point about the exploitation of the online world to attract the unwary and what that can lead to, which is why we are working with the companies concerned to see that content is removed. I highlight the online harms work, which will lead to a new regime to put new responsibilities on those companies to provide support in respect of the challenge of...

Home Department: Online Hate Speech and Extremism (28 Sep 2020)

James Brokenshire: As I indicated in response to the previous question, we are in discussion with the DCMS about these issues. It troubles me that sometimes this disinformation and these conspiracy theories can be used to galvanise more extremist behaviour. We are very alive to that in terms of working with our colleagues at the DCMS and in terms of our broader work in the Prevent space where this issue can...

Home Department: Online Hate Speech and Extremism (28 Sep 2020)

James Brokenshire: I highlight to the hon. Lady the work that is being led by the DCMS, with which we are working on the cross-Whitehall counter-disinformation unit, which has been stood up during this time of acute disinformation to challenge some of the conspiracy theories and false information. I assure her that there is extensive work across government to analyse and then work with the companies to take...

Home Department: Online Hate Speech and Extremism (28 Sep 2020)

James Brokenshire: The 2015 strategy was the first of its kind in the world in having a unit dedicated to countering extremism. I pay tribute to the work of the commissioner, and I read very carefully her words to the Select Committee last week. We will work with the commissioner—indeed, the Home Secretary met her last week—and we are working with the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and...


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