Results 121–140 of 11693 for speaker:James Brokenshire

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill: Clause 1 - Authorisation of criminal conduct (15 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: I reiterate again that a covert human intelligence source is not able to commit any and all criminality. I made that point on Second Reading. There are limits to the activity that can be authorised under the Bill and they are contained within the Human Rights Act 1998. The covert human intelligence sources code of practice also sits under this legislation and provides additional guidance and...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill: Clause 1 - Authorisation of criminal conduct (15 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: I have two minutes left and I still have a few more amendments I would like to discuss. On the issue of the economic wellbeing of the United Kingdom, it is an established statutory purpose for investigatory powers. It recognises that threats to the economic wellbeing of the UK could be immensely damaging. It might include the possibility of a hostile cyber-attack against our critical...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill: Clause 1 - Authorisation of criminal conduct (15 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: This has been a very informed, considered and thoughtful debate on the various amendments to the Bill that have been tabled for consideration. As right hon. and hon. Members will know, covert human intelligence sources play a crucial part in preventing, and safeguarding the public from, many very serious crimes, including terrorism, drugs and firearms offences, and child sexual exploitation...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill: Clause 1 - Authorisation of criminal conduct (15 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: My right hon. Friend makes a very powerful and important point about the issues at stake here. That is why we judge that there is, of course, a need for robust oversight to give confidence and to ensure that the powers available here are done in the right way, and we judge that the proposals in the amendments do not achieve that and actually have an impact on the operational effectiveness of...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill: Clause 1 - Authorisation of criminal conduct (15 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: I will respond to the hon. Lady formally in my winding-up speech, but I would like to stress that all public authorities that task juvenile CHIS must have regard to their safety, welfare and wellbeing, as required under sections 10 and 11 of the Children Act 2004 and the United Nations convention on the rights of the child. It is important that I state that. The hon. Lady is making some...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill: Clause 1 - Authorisation of criminal conduct (15 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: I do not know whether this will be helpful to the right hon. Gentleman, but I just draw his attention to paragraph 3.10 of the supported guidance, which underlines that the person granting the authorisation should hold a “reasonable belief” that the authorisation is necessary and proportionate. The important point he makes is addressed through the guidance.

Written Answers — Home Office: Fire Resistant Materials (15 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: The Home Office does not hold information on the quantity of flame retardant held by each fire and rescue service.

Written Answers — Home Office: Home Office: Pay (15 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: In the last 12 months the biggest percentage pay rise in the Home Office was 9% and the biggest pay rise in cash terms was £7,292.

Written Answers — Home Office: Cybercrime: Extortion (15 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: The Government does not advise paying ransoms to criminals. The payment of a ransom to criminals is likely to encourage further criminal activity and does not guarantee a successful outcome. The legal decision of whether or not to pay the ransom is ultimately a matter for the individuals or organisations concerned. We encourage victims of ransom demands to contact the authorities for support....

Written Answers — Home Office: Home Office: Private Finance Initiative (13 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: The most recent published information for live PFI contracts available is as at 31 March 2018 and can be found at the following link: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/ system/uploads/attachment_data/file/805262/Current_projects_ as_at_31_March_2018.xlsx

Written Answers — Home Office: Property: Corruption (12 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: The National Crime Agency’s International Corruption Unit (ICU) investigates bribery of foreign public officials by individuals or companies from the UK, and money laundering by corrupt foreign officials and their associates. The ICU and other UK law enforcement agencies investigating the proceeds of corruption do not specifically collate information on the value of property investigated....

Written Answers — Home Office: Criminal Records: Databases (9 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: We continue to discuss with the EU an agreement on law enforcement and criminal justice cooperation in criminal matters. The agreement should equip operational partners on both sides with the capabilities that help protect citizens and bring criminals to justice promoting the security of all our citizens. As set out in the UK’s Approach to Negotiations, we have proposed this should include...

Written Answers — Home Office: Hamas (8 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: The Government does not routinely comment on intelligence matters.

Written Answers — Home Office: Computer Misuse Act 1990 (7 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to PQ56039 on 11 June 2020.

Written Answers — Home Office: Home Office: Training (7 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: The table below shows the spend for the last two financial years. There was no spend for the financial years 16/17 or 17/18. Figures for the financial year 15/16 are not available. Spend on Unconscious Bias Training Period Spend 1 April 18 to 31 Mar 19 £7,949 1 April 19 to 31 Mar 20 £46,131

Written Answers — Home Office: Members: Correspondence (7 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: The Home Secretary responded on 24 September 2020.

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill (5 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: I appreciate the contribution that my hon. Friend, the Chair of the Justice Committee, is making and perhaps we can continue this conversation. I point him to the issues of proportionality and necessity, the requirement to consider matters that are not criminal to the end itself and the safeguards that the Human Rights Act provides, which I set out earlier. Therefore, there is a strong...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill (5 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: I beg to move, That the Bill be now read a Second time. This legislation is being introduced to keep our country safe and to ensure that our operational agencies and public authorities have access to the tools and intelligence that they need to keep us safe—safe from terrorists, safe from serious organised crime groups, and safe from others who wish to cause harm to our country and our...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill (5 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: I hope I will be able to respond to the hon. Gentleman during my speech, underlining some of the safeguards—the importance of oversight, which we attach equally to this Bill, and the operation of a criminal conduct authorisation, as contemplated by the Bill. I hope he will also have noted the specific reference to the Human Rights Act in the Bill, in order to underline some of the important...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill (5 Oct 2020)

James Brokenshire: The right hon. Gentleman is drawing me on to talk about some of those wider bodies. I will address that later in my speech, but I point out that the FSA is required to deal with issues associated with misrepresented food—food that may be harmful for human consumption. Therefore the issues of proportionality and necessity are bound within the frame of the Bill, and limit the activities that...


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