Results 141–160 of 12265 for speaker:David Gauke

Oral Answers to Questions — Work and Pensions: Contracted-out Health Assessments (13 Nov 2017)

David Gauke: My hon. Friend raises an important point and is absolutely right about the reason for the majority of overturned decisions. We continually look at how to increase co-ordination between the PIP and employment and support allowance assessment processes, and that is certainly something we are considering.

Oral Answers to Questions — Work and Pensions: Contracted-out Health Assessments (13 Nov 2017)

David Gauke: My answer to the hon. Lady’s first question is that I will, of course, happily look into that case if she will provide me with the details.

Oral Answers to Questions — Work and Pensions: Contracted-out Health Assessments (13 Nov 2017)

David Gauke: We are indeed looking into that. My hon. Friend has made an important point about the need for independent auditing of assessments to ensure that the advice provided by the decision-makers is of suitable quality, fully explained and justified, and recording is one of various options that we are considering to bring about those improvements.

Oral Answers to Questions — Work and Pensions: Contracted-out Health Assessments (13 Nov 2017)

David Gauke: Let me put the position in context. Since personal independence payments were introduced in 2013, the DWP has carried out more than 2.6 million assessments. As I said earlier, the total number of complaints received equates to fewer than 1% of all assessments. Our latest research shows that 76% of PIP claimants are satisfied with their overall experience. Of those 2.6 million decisions, 8%...

Oral Answers to Questions — Work and Pensions: Contracted-out Health Assessments (13 Nov 2017)

David Gauke: The timing of both ESA or PIP assessments has improved in recent months: the waiting time has been reduced. I welcome that, but we continue to work closely with the providers of the assessments to ensure that their performance is adequate.

Oral Answers to Questions — Work and Pensions: Universal Credit: Food Poverty (13 Nov 2017)

David Gauke: The availability of advances at the start of a universal credit claim ensures that those who need money immediately can access it. Our data shows that around half of claimants are receiving advances, and we have recently undertaken an exercise to improve awareness and access to this support.

Oral Answers to Questions — Work and Pensions: Universal Credit: Food Poverty (13 Nov 2017)

David Gauke: This is why I repeatedly make the point that nobody needs to wait a long period of time for cash support under the universal credit system, and to suggest otherwise is causing unnecessary anxiety for those who are not on universal credit—and I think we should all discuss this in a slightly more responsible manner.

Oral Answers to Questions — Work and Pensions: Universal Credit: Food Poverty (13 Nov 2017)

David Gauke: My hon. Friend is absolutely right. Part of the purpose of universal credit is to close the gap between being out of work and being in work. Most jobs are paid monthly, and getting people used to that monthly system is a sensible approach. I also very much welcome the fact that my hon. Friend has visited a jobcentre, and I recommend that other hon. Members do so, to hear how universal credit...

Oral Answers to Questions — Work and Pensions: Universal Credit: Food Poverty (13 Nov 2017)

David Gauke: The position that we have made clear for a long time is that we want to ensure that universal credit works. This is a test-and-learn system, and we are always looking at ways in which we can improve it, particularly for that first period. I would say to the right hon. Gentleman and to the House as a whole that universal credit is helping us to address the best way to deal with poverty, which...

Oral Answers to Questions — Work and Pensions: Universal Credit: Food Poverty (13 Nov 2017)

David Gauke: My hon. Friend is absolutely right. This is why we are recruiting work coaches up and down the United Kingdom to provide the personalised support that people need to help them get into work. I come back to my experience of meeting work coaches in jobcentres up and down the country. They believe that they have a system in place that is helping them to do more to transform lives, and that is...

Oral Answers to Questions — Work and Pensions: Universal Credit: Food Poverty (13 Nov 2017)

David Gauke: Universal credit gives people a better opportunity to work, and it gives parents, including single parents, greater support with childcare. I come back to the example I gave the House a moment ago. Someone who had previously been on income support and unable to get help with childcare can now get that help and get on to the employment ladder, thanks to universal credit. That is what universal...

Oral Answers to Questions — Work and Pensions: Universal Credit: Food Poverty (13 Nov 2017)

David Gauke: May I just point out that child poverty is down since 2010? I think the hon. Lady has rather given the game away: she does not want to pause and fix universal credit; she wants to scrap it. She wants to rewind to a system under which claimants faced marginal deduction rates of over 90% and had to cope with a multitude of benefits. We had a benefits system that was not an aid but an impediment...

Oral Answers to Questions — Work and Pensions: Universal Credit (13 Nov 2017)

David Gauke: Advances are available at the start of a universal credit claim to ensure that those who need it have money to tide them over until their first payment. Our data shows that around half of claimants are receiving advances, and we have recently undertaken an exercise to improve awareness and access to this support.

Oral Answers to Questions — Work and Pensions: Universal Credit (13 Nov 2017)

David Gauke: In total, it is estimated that universal credit will help around 250,000 more people into employment. On average, that works out at around 400 extra people in work in each parliamentary constituency, but universal credit will, of course, have larger impacts in areas with a higher proportion of benefit claimants or a higher prevalence of single-parent and out-of-work families.

Oral Answers to Questions — Work and Pensions: Universal Credit (13 Nov 2017)

David Gauke: We are improving the advances system, and we are improving awareness of it. Importantly, support is available, and that is a message that we can all take to our constituents. Nobody needs to wait six weeks because advances are available within jobcentres, and they are being taken up. The majority of new claimants are taking up those advances.

Oral Answers to Questions — Work and Pensions: Universal Credit (13 Nov 2017)

David Gauke: I entirely agree with the point my hon. Friend makes. It is worth pointing out that, in the normal course of events, someone’s advance takes about three days to go through the banking system and for the money to be paid, but that, if need be, people can get support on the same day.

Oral Answers to Questions — Work and Pensions: Job Creation (13 Nov 2017)

David Gauke: Since 2010, more than 3 million more people have found employment. The employment rate is close to the record high, while the unemployment rate is the lowest it has been since 1975.

Oral Answers to Questions — Work and Pensions: Job Creation (13 Nov 2017)

David Gauke: I agree with my hon. Friend on that. It is right that service providers have a duty to anticipate these things and provide adjustments, where reasonable, for disabled people. In the case of her constituent, this may include arranging events at an accessible venue. It is also worth pointing out that one in five of those taking up the new enterprise allowance, which is designed to help people...

Oral Answers to Questions — Work and Pensions: Job Creation (13 Nov 2017)

David Gauke: Of course the highest earning 1% pay a bigger proportion of income tax than they ever have done before. I am also pleased to say that our Government have substantially increased the personal allowance; we have introduced the national living wage; and the support that universal credit is going to provide will help more and more people progress in work.

Oral Answers to Questions — Work and Pensions: Benefits System: Working Hours (13 Nov 2017)

David Gauke: Universal credit is transforming and modernising the welfare state, ending complicated rules around employment hours and the cliff edges of the old system. Universal credit has a clear system of allowances and tapers to ensure that claimants know that they are always better off in work.


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