Results 141–160 of 1367 for speaker:Mr Matthew Green

Town Planning (26 May 2004)

Mr Matthew Green: Will the hon. Gentleman give way?

Town Planning (26 May 2004)

Mr Matthew Green: I thank the hon. Gentleman. He pointed out that there were now 1 million more houses than households. That is partly due to the large and increasing number of second homes. Does he accept the principle adopted by us, and indeed the Government, of ending second-home council tax discounts?

Local Government Finance (17 May 2004)

Mr Matthew Green: This debate has shown the House at its worst. The public always say that there is too much yah-boo in the conduct of our business. When my hon. Friend the Member for Kingston and Surbiton (Mr. Davey) stood up today, he had a well written speech—

Local Government Finance (17 May 2004)

Mr Matthew Green: The hon. Gentleman is still at it. My hon. Friend had a well written contribution to make to the debate on local government finance, but the representatives of the Labour and Conservative parties clearly had no intention of debating local government finance. They just wanted to play yah-boo politics. However, I will try to answer some of the questions that have emerged from the debate. The...

Local Government Finance (17 May 2004)

Mr Matthew Green: My hon. Friend is right. The Government have capped an authority that the public support because it has increased the number of officers. The Government are getting it wrong and they should withdraw the proposals to cap that authority. The Minister would not read out the four advantages of local income tax that were identified by the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy. He...

Local Government Finance (17 May 2004)

Mr Matthew Green: Because once it is in place, one can, over successive years, reduce national income tax and shift it on to local income tax. That shift in the balance of funding could be effected in other ways. For example, the shadow Chancellor proposed in a speech in February that the proportion that is raised locally should rise and that the amount coming through central Government grant should be cut....

Local Government Finance (17 May 2004)

Mr Matthew Green: The hon. Gentleman says that it is not enough, but what do his Government propose to do to make millionaires pay more? If they had any such proposals, we would welcome them. The hon. Member for City of York (Hugh Bayley) mentioned excellent authorities, but I am afraid that his Whips' briefing missed one out—Cambridge is an excellent authority with majority Liberal Democrat control.

Local Government Finance (17 May 2004)

Mr Matthew Green: I cannot give way, because I have only a minute left. The hon. Gentleman—this is the most telling point—described the idea of local income tax as being for people living in a fantasy world. Clearly, then, people in the United States, Japan and most of Europe live in a fantasy world, because that is where local income tax is used and works. The fact is that local income tax is a fair...

Local Government Finance (17 May 2004)

Mr Matthew Green: Liverpool.

Local Government Finance (17 May 2004)

Mr Matthew Green: The hon. Gentleman read out an interesting set of figures about Wigan, which confirms that tax payers in Wigan would pay less under our policy than they do under council tax. He is arguing in favour of his electorate paying more.

Local Government Finance (17 May 2004)

Mr Matthew Green: The Minister clearly has quotes from the CIPFA report in front of him. Early on, on page 3 I think, CIPFA lists some advantages and disadvantages of the local income tax. Perhaps the Minister would like to read out the four main advantages cited.

Planning and Compulsory Purchase Bill: Clause 1 — Regional Spatial Strategy (12 May 2004)

Mr Matthew Green: I congratulate the Minister on finally completing a process that has lasted 18 months. The passage of the Bill through the House must be one of the longest in parliamentary history. I am sorry that the hon. Member for Chipping Barnet (Sir Sydney Chapman) has left the Chamber—perhaps he could not stomach much of the speech by the hon. Member for South Holland and The Deepings (Mr....

Planning and Compulsory Purchase Bill: Clause 1 — Regional Spatial Strategy (12 May 2004)

Mr Matthew Green: It is a step forward, but such a small one. I am just pointing out that no great victory has been won. It is a tiny victory and the hon. Gentleman described it as though it were a U-turn by the Minister to rank with the Prime Minister's U-turn on a referendum on the constitution for Europe. It does not begin to approach that.

Planning and Compulsory Purchase Bill: Clause 1 — Regional Spatial Strategy (12 May 2004)

Mr Matthew Green: It would appear that the hon. Gentleman wants there to be court cases in which county councils challenge regional planning bodies on how reasonable they have been. That is not a very effective approach, and I am sure that the Minister would not want that. Indeed, he has already threatened that if that happens he will come back to the House to remove this minor provision. In reality, of...

Planning and Compulsory Purchase Bill: Clause 1 — Regional Spatial Strategy (12 May 2004)

Mr Matthew Green: The hon. Gentleman should speak for his own party.

Planning and Compulsory Purchase Bill: Clause 1 — Regional Spatial Strategy (12 May 2004)

Mr Matthew Green: Will the Minister confirm that, although there is a duty on the RPB to consult the counties about the desirability of these bodies, the decision on whether there will be any bodies will still lie with the unelected RPB, which can, of course, ignore the advice given to it by county councils?

Housing Bill: New Clause 2 — Tenancy Deposit Scheme (Regulation-Making Power) (11 May 2004)

Mr Matthew Green: I remind the hon. Gentleman that good landlords also lose out from the absence of a tenancy deposit scheme, because they lose money when tenants withhold their last month's payment. A good scheme would help both tenants and landlords.

Housing Bill: New Clause 2 — Tenancy Deposit Scheme (Regulation-Making Power) (11 May 2004)

Mr Matthew Green: I support a tenancy deposit scheme and I know that the Government need a little push to ensure that it gets into the Bill. However, we need to ensure that any scheme would not be universal. The Government scheme should be a fall-back position for cases in which someone has not joined an industry scheme.

Housing Bill: New Clause 2 — Tenancy Deposit Scheme (Regulation-Making Power) (11 May 2004)

Mr Matthew Green: I agree that that is why it should be mandatory. If the Government scheme is a fall-back scheme and the industry schemes are retained, landlords will have a range of schemes from which to choose. I hope that the Minister will agree that that is the best way forward and will also confirm that the Government will include this provision in the Bill. It would enhance the Bill and this is the best...

Housing Bill: New Clause 8 — Exceptions to the right to buy: determination whether exception for dwelling-house suitable for elderly persons applies (11 May 2004)

Mr Matthew Green: The exceptions policy is used in rural areas to allow affordable houses to be built outside building envelopes. It is currently being considered under one of the new planning policy statements. I should be delighted if the Minister would confirm that she is not about to end the exceptions policy.


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