Results 101–120 of 3311 for speaker:Lord Rowlands

Government of Wales Bill (28 Jun 2006)

Lord Rowlands: My Lords, will the noble Lord confirm that if a referendum was called on Part 3 and the Opposition had their way, they would campaign for a no vote?

Government of Wales Bill (28 Jun 2006)

Lord Rowlands: My Lords, in most cases, the old traditional statutory instruments of the kind he has described have flown from primary legislation that has been fully subject to debate in both Houses.

Government of Wales Bill (28 Jun 2006)

Lord Rowlands: My Lords, I thank the noble Lord, Lord Thomas, for mentioning my membership of the Richard commission. The commission indeed recommended that there should ultimately be a full transfer of primary powers, but also recognised that there would be a long interim period, not of months but years. It explored the possibilities of enhanced legislative powers being given to the Assembly in that...

Government of Wales Bill (27 Jun 2006)

Lord Rowlands: My Lords, I thank the noble Lord, Lord Crickhowell, for tabling his amendments. In doing so, it allows us to follow up the arguments and discussions that took place following the speech made by my noble friend Lord Temple-Morris. My noble friend has reminded us that his speech raised considerable concerns in many of our minds about what had happened. Initially, when we found out that Section...

Government of Wales Bill (27 Jun 2006)

Lord Rowlands: My Lords, the noble Lord would have made a good point if there had just been a schedule listing all the bodies, but we have a categorisation here that offers them four different kinds of protection ranging from minimal protection to retrenchment. But what have the first four bodies listed in the present schedule in common that causes them to be bracketed in this particular category? For...

Government of Wales Bill (27 Jun 2006)

Lord Rowlands: My Lords, I draw the attention of the noble Lord, Lord Livsey, to the fact that the Richard commission recommended STV and an 80-Member seat on the transfer of full primary powers to the Assembly and not in the context of this Bill. Amendment No. 2, subsection (2), reads: "Each Assembly constituency shall be comprised of no more than one tenth and no less than one twenty-fifth of the eligible...

Government of Wales Bill (6 Jun 2006)

Lord Rowlands: I am extremely grateful to all those who have contributed to the debate. I was not sure that I had triggered such a variety of conundrums and discussions. It is important, because this is a novel device and use of an Order in Council to achieve a perfectly proper purpose: an enhancement of the legislative competence of the Assembly in specific areas. If I may respond to my noble friend and to...

Government of Wales Bill (6 Jun 2006)

Lord Rowlands: I hope that when my noble friend replies he will make clear that any draft Order in Council brought to both Houses at Westminster will have a context that, in many cases, will be quite specific. It will be a specific proposal to create, for example, one public ombudsman or to create powers under transport to achieve certain specific purposes.

Government of Wales Bill (6 Jun 2006)

Lord Rowlands: The noble Lord, Lord Thomas of Gresford, does not distinguish between the issues in the Bill. My noble friend referred to "deepening, not broadening". The process by which, as I understand it, the Assembly would gain a new field—that of energy—is available by amending Schedule 7, or whatever it is. It is a separate process. It is nothing to do with Part 3 in respect of expanding...

Government of Wales Bill (6 Jun 2006)

Lord Rowlands: I am grateful to the noble Lord, Lord Kingsland, for his response. When my noble friend said there were two groups, the devolutionists and the restrictionists, I am not sure where he was putting me—in the middle. It is an uncomfortable position to be in the middle. Nevertheless, I think that Amendment No. 64B in the name of the noble Lord, Lord Kingsland, definitely falls in the...

Government of Wales Bill (6 Jun 2006)

Lord Rowlands: I challenge the noble Lord with some trepidation, because he is obviously experienced and knowledgeable in this matter, but I do not think he is right. Surely, the Orders in Council will give the Assembly legislative competence under an existing field. The mock order states: "Part 1 of Schedule 5 to the Government of Wales Act 2006 is amended by inserting under "Field 14: public...

Government of Wales Bill (6 Jun 2006)

Lord Rowlands: If there is a subsequent measure beyond the first measure, does that not have to stay within the terms of the original Order in Council, or can it go beyond it? Let us take the mock order on the ombudsman. Would it be possible in a subsequent measure to alter and amend the role of the ombudsman in such a way that it would be different from that which the Order in Council defined?

Government of Wales Bill (6 Jun 2006)

Lord Rowlands: moved Amendment No. 61C: Page 51, line 40, at end insert— "( ) An Order in Council under this section shall include all of the principal features of the proposed Assembly Measure."

Government of Wales Bill (6 Jun 2006)

Lord Rowlands: I believe that, since the experience of 1998 and the legislative requirements of the Assembly, there is widespread support to enable the Assembly to gain easier access to legislation than the current arrangements allow. The present arrangements are inevitably about trying to get a couple of Bills into the parliamentary Session and to achieve success for either Wales-only Bills or UK Bills...

Government of Wales Bill (3 May 2006)

Lord Rowlands: The noble Lord, Lord Roberts, fails to understand the fundamental distinction between Part 3 and Part 4. Part 4 would give primary powers to the Welsh Assembly, and neither this House nor the other place would thereafter have any responsibility or control over legislation—except the one catch-all provision that Parliament always remains sovereign. That is as true of the Scotland Act as it...

Government of Wales Bill (3 May 2006)

Lord Rowlands: The noble Lord cannot get away with that because his own amendment defines what the question will be. It will be whether the Welsh electorate supports the Assembly measure provisions. His own amendment defines what the Assembly measure provisions are: Clauses 92 to 101 of this Bill. The noble Lord cannot get away from how one would handle a referendum dealing with nine complicated clauses,...

Government of Wales Bill (3 May 2006)

Lord Rowlands: I am puzzled by this amendment because, by this time, the measure would have gone through the Assembly. It would have evolved. It would have been debated at great length and scrutinised following an Order in Council approving that competence. Therefore, what would this House be expected to do when that measure is complete? The House would not have been party to any stage of the Assembly...

Government of Wales Bill (3 May 2006)

Lord Rowlands: But there will have been a previous reference to this place. That is what the Orders in Council process does. The original draft Order in Council bestows on the Assembly the power to go ahead and make the measure. That is the difference between full transfer of primary powers and what this part of the Bill does.

Government of Wales Bill (3 May 2006)

Lord Rowlands: Does this Bill repeat Section 28 of that Act in any place?

Government of Wales Bill (22 Mar 2006)

Lord Rowlands: My Lords, given the time, I shall confine my observations to Parts 3 and 4 of the Bill. First, it was a privilege and a pleasure to be a member of the Richard commission and to serve under my noble friend's chairmanship. At least he will have the satisfaction of knowing that, unlike many other commission reports, the dust has not gathered on his. Not only has it not gathered dust, it has been...


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