Results 61–80 of 2018 for speaker:Mr William Ross

Orders of the Day — Police (Northern Ireland) Bill (Allocation of Time): Supplemental Orders (11 Jul 2000)

Mr William Ross: As you will appreciate, Mr. Deputy Speaker, the opportunity to make such remarks on Second Reading has passed and, as a consequence of the motion, time will be so severely restricted that it will be impossible to make them on Third Reading. If I am not to have an opportunity to make such remarks, does not that show that the Government's timetable motion is creating serious defects and that...

Orders of the Day — Police (Northern Ireland) Bill (Allocation of Time): Supplemental Orders (11 Jul 2000)

Mr William Ross: I respect your ruling, Mr. Deputy Speaker, and I am content to comply with it. I was trying to draw an analogy with what happened with the poll tax legislation, which seemed simple and straightforward at first, but which led to riots and all sorts of problems. That was also driven through the House with a large Government majority and had unforeseen consequences, although some foresaw them....

Orders of the Day — Police (Northern Ireland) Bill (Allocation of Time): Supplemental Orders (11 Jul 2000)

Mr William Ross: Sometimes, Mr. Deputy Speaker, it is necessary to draw analogies.

Orders of the Day — Police (Northern Ireland) Bill (Allocation of Time): Supplemental Orders (11 Jul 2000)

Mr William Ross: Indeed, Mr. Deputy Speaker. I am grateful for the help that you give me in reaching conclusions. I believe that the Chamber is a counterweight to outside influences. It is the place where these matters must be discussed in detail, and that takes time. I remember when a Member of the House changed his mind after long discussions in Committee. If the debate is long and detailed enough,...

Orders of the Day — Police (Northern Ireland) Bill (Allocation of Time): Supplemental Orders (11 Jul 2000)

Mr William Ross: The Chief Constable of the Royal Ulster Constabulary is usually able to tell us who is responsible for these attacks—such as the one earlier this week, when he said at about 7 am, the attack having taken place the previous evening, that the bomb was the responsibility of dissidents. Has he been able to say whether it was dissidents or the Provisional IRA who were responsible for that attack?

Points of Order (5 Jul 2000)

Mr William Ross: On a point of order, Madam Speaker. During Prime Minister's questions, the right hon. Gentleman answered a question that was put to him last week. That seems to be a departure from normal procedure. Is it to be part of our procedure in future, so that we can all get our questions answered?

Civil List (4 Jul 2000)

Mr William Ross: I suppose that I am one of the few people in the House who are always suspicious when the leaders of the two main parties agree, even when the issue is one such as this. Will the Prime Minister tell us whether the present arrangements will last for only as long as the current monarch is on the throne? Will new arrangements be made every time a new sovereign ascends the throne? Will he also...

Opposition Day: Prisoners (Early Release) (3 Jul 2000)

Mr William Ross: The main purpose of the debate is to discuss early release from prison in England and Wales. However, this Parliament covers the United Kingdom, and it is important to bring to the House a perspective on the early release of prisoners from the Celtic fringe, as it were. I listened to the comments of the right hon. and learned Member for Sleaford and North Hykeham (Mr. Hogg) on early release...

Opposition Day: Prisoners (Early Release) (3 Jul 2000)

Mr William Ross: I shall come to that in a moment. The hon. Gentleman pre-empted me by a few moments. The Government did not give detailed, comprehensive thought to the effects of creating circumstances in which a well-organised terrorist structure could claim success in getting prisoners out before they had completed their sentences. That unquestionably happened. Hundreds of such people from both sides of...

European Council (21 Jun 2000)

Mr William Ross: Will the Prime Minister consider using the term "murder" instead of "killing" for such terrorist acts, because the word "killing" tends to sanitise them in a way that the people of this country will not understand? Will the Prime Minister also reflect on the fact that, although our continental companion countries had a problem that led them to come up with the idea of a withholding tax, that...

Oral Answers to Questions — Northern Ireland: Punishment Beatings (21 Jun 2000)

Mr William Ross: Since the Secretary of State has been paying careful attention to statistics, he will be well aware that the evidence and the statistics show that the terrorist organisations have been able to switch the level of their terrorist mutilations on and off at will over the past two or three years. Is he further aware that those are simply a means of these people imposing their will on their...

Business of the House (15 May 2000)

Mr William Ross: Given that most people in the United Kingdom would consider it a matter of course that the national flag should fly over public and Government buildings, why was that ever denied to the British citizens of Northern Ireland? Furthermore, why have the Government decided to give IRA and other terrorists a further year—over and above the two years that they have had already—before they hand...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Rate of Duty on Beer (2 May 2000)

Mr William Ross: I have opposed the year-on-year tobacco duty increases under Conservative and Labour rule, not least because Northern Ireland's tobacco industry suffers grievously as a result of them. I have also always opposed the constant ratchet effect in respect of road tax and the price of road fuel. We see Government policy on tobacco taxation as having three aims: increasing revenues, reducing...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Rate of Duty on Beer (2 May 2000)

Mr William Ross: One appreciates the fact that the increase in the number of officers and the new technology that is coming on stream will have an effect, but the tobacco industry in Northern Ireland does not believe that it will have the impact for which the Government evidently hope. Not all the tobacco that arrives in Great Britain necessarily comes across to Dover or even into England; some could come to...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Rate of Duty on Beer (2 May 2000)

Mr William Ross: I have read different comments by that body, but the hon. Gentleman is correct to say that it recognises the smoke and mirrors in the whole hypothecation argument. Having said that about the Chancellor, I have to say that his figures are being contested. I understand—at least, my researchers tell me—that in the November 1999 pre-Budget report, he announced the hypothecation of tobacco...

Demonstrations (London and Manchester) (2 May 2000)

Mr William Ross: Given the contents of the Home Secretary's statement and his answers to questions today, it is plain that both he and the police were aware that yesterday's violence was carefully planned over a long period. As no one makes such detailed plans without a clear objective, why did the right hon. Gentleman describe yesterday's events as mindless violence?

Oral Answers to Questions — Health: Nurses (2 May 2000)

Mr William Ross: The Secretary of State said earlier that it was essential to use national health service capacity to the full. Does he agree that one of the great bottlenecks is the shortage of nurses trained for intensive care, because that ties up an awful lot of people in bed blocking when they should be out and about?

Orders of the Day — Budget Resolutions and Economic Situation (27 Mar 2000)

Mr William Ross: I listened today to the right hon. Member for Ashton-under-Lyne (Mr. Sheldon), who said that the Government were in a very happy position because they have had a surge in revenue. I think that he was referring, at least partly, to the fact that we are now repaying debt, rather than having to borrow. I remember the roars of joy from Conservative Members—and even from Ulster Unionist...

Orders of the Day — Budget Resolutions and Economic Situation (27 Mar 2000)

Mr William Ross: That is exactly what I mean. I remember that, one year, there was a £50 billion overdraft that no one had really expected. I therefore do not think that any party should crow too much about the level of future danger. Those dangers are real, and it takes only a relatively small percentage change to put a Government into surplus or deficit. I am looking for a Chancellor and a Government who...


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