Results 121–140 of 2497 for speaker:Lord Robertson of Port Ellen

European Union (Amendment) Bill (6 May 2008)

Lord Robertson of Port Ellen: I wonder whether the noble Lord, instead of taking one sentence out of context from the new combined treaty, would read all of the next couple of paragraphs. There, the answer to the question is quite clearly laid out. Even if we reached the point, by unanimity, of deciding that there would be a defence policy, the caveats about individual nations are quite clearly laid out in the next...

European Union (Amendment) Bill (6 May 2008)

Lord Robertson of Port Ellen: Who are these other countries in the European Union that are antagonistic to NATO?

European Union (Amendment) Bill (6 May 2008)

Lord Robertson of Port Ellen: I listened carefully to the noble Lord on the defence aspects of common foreign and security policy and I could not disagree with him more. I led NATO for four years, but I am also a passionate European. More than both of those, I am a passionate realist. I live in the United Kingdom; we are part of the European continent and a European community of nations. If we are to look after ourselves...

European Union (Amendment) Bill (6 May 2008)

Lord Robertson of Port Ellen: The noble Lord refers to untrustworthy foreigners. I was Secretary-General of NATO, which is an organisation that lives by confidentiality and a lot of things that go way beyond the normal aspect of data. There are 26 members of NATO. Most of them are members also of the European Union. If NATO has since it was established in 1949 managed procedures to protect what needs to be protected, why...

European Union (Amendment) Bill (6 May 2008)

Lord Robertson of Port Ellen: I wonder whether the noble Lord remembers a debate that he and I had on Sky television at the time of the Maastricht ratification procedure. He made the statement, which made the front page of the Observer the following Sunday, that if Maastricht was carried through, the British Chancellor of the Exchequer would have no more powers than the treasurer of a rate-capped local authority. That was...

European Union (Amendment) Bill (6 May 2008)

Lord Robertson of Port Ellen: I think that I am about to die. It is said that before an individual dies, their whole life flashes before their eyes. I have that sense now. For 11 of the 18 years we spent in opposition, I was Front-Bench Opposition spokesman for foreign affairs. The noble Lord, Lord Howell, and I used to parade around television and radio studios talking to diminishing audiences about the intricacies of...

European Union (Amendment) Bill (6 May 2008)

Lord Robertson of Port Ellen: The noble Lord makes the argument most succinctly, but he voted for it. The biggest extension of qualified majority voting since the treaty of Rome was established, and we saw that through. The noble Baroness, Lady Thatcher, was a great proponent of the Single European Act, although she claimed afterwards that Malcolm Rifkind had confused her at the time. I thought that I was turning the same...

Kosovo (29 Oct 2007)

Lord Robertson of Port Ellen: My Lords, before I ask my noble friend about relations between NATO and the European Union and future security arrangements in Kosovo, for the sake of propriety I must say that I am the chairman of Cable & Wireless International which operates a mobile phone service in Kosovo through one of its subsidiary companies. However, on Brussels and the relationship between NATO and the EU, are there...

Iraq (16 Apr 2007)

Lord Robertson of Port Ellen: My Lords, I add my voice to that of my noble friend and of the whole House in his sympathy and condolence for those who have died in the past few weeks, their families, their friends—and those who have died in Iraq and Afghanistan during the past three years. In the light of their sacrifice and their families' agonies, is there not a danger of us scalding ourselves in cold water by focusing...

QinetiQ: Privatisation (27 Feb 2006)

Lord Robertson of Port Ellen: My Lords, I congratulate my noble friend the Minister on getting a pretty good deal from the Treasury over the IPO for QinetiQ. Not everybody gets a good deal from the Treasury. As the Defence Secretary who made the decision in principle to put part of the Defence Evaluation and Research Agency into the private sector, my decision has been well and truly vindicated by events since then. The...

Terrorism Bill (13 Dec 2005)

Lord Robertson of Port Ellen: Leaving aside the challenge that, "Some people do not know about the courts but they know about something else" and, "Some people know about intercept evidence but they do not know enough about the courts"; Sir Swinton Thomas knows about both. So why does the noble Lord think it was that someone of his eminence, charged with this responsibility, knowing the courts as he does and knowing the...

Terrorism Bill (13 Dec 2005)

Lord Robertson of Port Ellen: On the grounds that I do not have the same amount of déjà vu on the subject as everyone else, I will speak first in the debate initiated by the noble and learned Lord. First, again I declare what might be an interest. I am deputy chairman of Cable and Wireless, the second largest telecommunications company in the country. But I repeat that I talk today from my experience as a former...

Terrorism Bill (13 Dec 2005)

Lord Robertson of Port Ellen: That sounds quite plausible and reasonable. If Sir Swinton Thomas, who is in charge, were to come and make that case, and if he believed that the intelligence agencies thought that that was a possibility and could be done without compromising sources and techniques, I might be prepared to consider it. But, as I say, if the man the country has appointed to look specifically at the...

Terrorism Bill (13 Dec 2005)

Lord Robertson of Port Ellen: Advising them on how they collected their intelligence was not really part of my responsibilities, but for a period, I had responsibility for the intelligence services of this country. If others wish to follow our example, I am sure it is open to them to do so.

Interception of Communications (Admissibility of Evidence) Bill [HL] (18 Nov 2005)

Lord Robertson of Port Ellen: My Lords, I should make it absolutely clear, since perhaps it was not clear from my speech, that I also oppose the matter being referred to a Select Committee. My noble friend Lady Taylor also made it clear in her speech that she opposed it, so silence should not necessarily be taken as consent.

Interception of Communications (Admissibility of Evidence) Bill [HL] (18 Nov 2005)

Lord Robertson of Port Ellen: My Lords, although I intend to speak from my past, not current, experience, I should say, whether relevant or not, that I am deputy chairman of Cable & Wireless, a telecommunications company in the United Kingdom. I am delighted to follow the noble and learned Lord, Lord Ackner, who has made a devastating contribution to the proceedings here today. He has allowed me to be briefer than I...

Interception of Communications (Admissibility of Evidence) Bill [HL] (18 Nov 2005)

Lord Robertson of Port Ellen: My Lords, I am sure that clever lawyers could draw up a precise framework and even cleverer lawyers will be able to find their way round it. That is the point made by my noble friend Lady Ramsay. Depending on the discretion of the judge—at the end of the day, that is what we would be depending on—the defence can range far and wide, as it has done in the past, and compromise material that...

Interception of Communications (Admissibility of Evidence) Bill [HL] (18 Nov 2005)

Lord Robertson of Port Ellen: My Lords, I am not in a position to give a precise answer to that, but I recollect that recently there was a case where some form of intercept material was put into court and the judge decided that all the material, not simply the extract that was relevant, had to be transcribed and be part of the court's evidence. I am merely postulating what might happen if the current restrictions were...

Interception of Communications (Admissibility of Evidence) Bill [HL] (18 Nov 2005)

Lord Robertson of Port Ellen: My Lords, frankly, I can think of nothing worse than withdrawing the case halfway through. We are here discussing the effectiveness and deterrent value of the law. I accept that cases will not proceed to court and that bad people will not be prosecuted in certain circumstances. That is the price we pay for ensuring that the information is available. It is a fact that terrorist outrages have...

Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (26 May 2004)

Lord Robertson of Port Ellen: My Lords, I am very grateful for this opportunity to address the House for the first time, so I thank the noble Lord, Lord Wright, for his initiative and congratulate him on securing the debate. He and I know each other well. We had the pleasure of being together on the British Council board for a few years when he was Permanent Secretary at the Foreign Office. We also had the memorable...


<< < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>

Create an alert

Did you find what you were looking for?

Advanced search

Find this exact word or phrase

You can also do this from the main search box by putting exact words in quotes: like "cycling" or "hutton report"

By default, we show words related to your search term, like “cycle” and “cycles” in a search for cycling. Putting the word in quotes, like "cycling", will stop this.

Excluding these words

You can also do this from the main search box by putting a minus sign before words you don’t want: like hunting -fox

We also support a bunch of boolean search modifiers, like AND and NEAR, for precise searching.

Date range

to

You can give a start date, an end date, or both to restrict results to a particular date range. A missing end date implies the current date, and a missing start date implies the oldest date we have in the system. Dates can be entered in any format you wish, e.g. 3rd March 2007 or 17/10/1989

Person

Enter a name here to restrict results to contributions only by that person.

Section

Restrict results to a particular parliament or assembly that we cover (e.g. the Scottish Parliament), or a particular type of data within an institution, such as Commons Written Answers.

Column

If you know the actual Hansard column number of the information you are interested in (perhaps you’re looking up a paper reference), you can restrict results to that; you can also use column:123 in the main search box.