Results 41–60 of 1315 for speaker:Dr Mo Mowlam

Orders of the Day — Regulatory Reform Bill [Lords] (19 Mar 2001)

Dr Mo Mowlam: My recollection is that we have used the legislation about 10 times. That is not an excessive number, but it shows that there is a need to reform the 1994 Act, to extend its powers and to make it clear, so that it can be used more often.

Orders of the Day — Regulatory Reform Bill [Lords] (19 Mar 2001)

Dr Mo Mowlam: I appreciate my hon. Friend's intervention.

Orders of the Day — Regulatory Reform Bill [Lords] (19 Mar 2001)

Dr Mo Mowlam: I have already taken interventions on that point, and I should prefer to move on. The important point is that the Bill is based on the Deregulation and Contracting Out Act 1994, which was passed by the previous Government I am waiting to see whether Opposition Members will point out that we voted against that Act.

Orders of the Day — Regulatory Reform Bill [Lords] (19 Mar 2001)

Dr Mo Mowlam: Good. I will be waiting for that point, because my answer is that we needed to change the 1994 Act to make it workable. We are using it as a basis for the Bill. We need to update the Act because, among other things, its powers are limited to pre-1994 legislation; it cannot remove burdens from the public sector; it does not allow subsequent amendment of deregulation orders, which limits its...

Orders of the Day — Regulatory Reform Bill [Lords] (19 Mar 2001)

Dr Mo Mowlam: No, the hon. Gentleman has got it completely wrong. For the reasons that I gave earlier, the Bill is necessary to build on and improve the Act passed by the previous Government.

Orders of the Day — Regulatory Reform Bill [Lords] (19 Mar 2001)

Dr Mo Mowlam: I should like to hear from Conservative Members what changes they think necessary. I have outlined our changes, which stem from the work that we have done. We have provided the Library with a list of 50 measures—

Orders of the Day — Regulatory Reform Bill [Lords] (19 Mar 2001)

Dr Mo Mowlam: We changed the number to 50. All those measures could be taken under the new Bill. In addition, we have today issued five consultation documents on orders that will be made possible by the Bill and, between them, bring benefits of almost £40 million. The estimated compliance cost for those orders is nil.

Orders of the Day — Regulatory Reform Bill [Lords] (19 Mar 2001)

Dr Mo Mowlam: Yes, but this is the last time because I am making very little progress.

Orders of the Day — Regulatory Reform Bill [Lords] (19 Mar 2001)

Dr Mo Mowlam: Earlier in my speech, I gave the answer to that question. The costs that the hon. Gentleman quotes include the entitlements and benefits that individuals received through the changes that we introduced and the bureaucracy involved in implementing them. The real costs are a fraction of that figure. We shall not apologise for the costs of introducing the minimum wage, improving maternity leave,...

Orders of the Day — Regulatory Reform Bill [Lords] (19 Mar 2001)

Dr Mo Mowlam: Will my hon. Friend give me a minute—perhaps two or three minutes? Orders made under the Bill will be subject to thorough consultation and examination by scrutiny Committees in both Houses. The process will not avoid scrutiny. The deregulation Committees in both Houses are serious, efficient and competent bodies and the scrutiny will be up to a high standard. Legal safeguards, including...

Orders of the Day — Regulatory Reform Bill [Lords] (19 Mar 2001)

Dr Mo Mowlam: Those important points show the commitment of Conservative Members, and I look forward to a comment from the hon. Member for South Cambridgeshire (Mr. Lansley) on that intervention.

Orders of the Day — Regulatory Reform Bill [Lords] (19 Mar 2001)

Dr Mo Mowlam: With those safeguards in place, and for the Committees concerned, let me outline some of what we might wish to do under the Bill that is not possible under the 1994 Act. Situations often arise in which, with the passage of time, legislation has become outdated and no longer fits people's day-to-day needs. Anomalies develop and it simply no longer makes sense. For example, invalid care...

Orders of the Day — Regulatory Reform Bill [Lords] (19 Mar 2001)

Dr Mo Mowlam: Certainly. If the hon. Gentleman wants me to read them, I shall do so with pleasure. [Interruption.] I have left the list in my office; what bad luck. [Interruption.] I have been passed a copy; I do not want to disappoint the hon. Gentleman if he wants to hear them. For the hon. Gentleman's benefit the measures include: the abolition of 20 partner limit; after-hours child care at schools;...

Orders of the Day — Regulatory Reform Bill [Lords] (19 Mar 2001)

Dr Mo Mowlam: Some of the measures may not be crucial, as the hon. Gentleman implies, but what is important is that the legislation makes sense—that is one of the reasons that we are introducing the Bill. Regulation should not be burdensome; it should be easy to implement and should protect rights while not making heavy demands on business. That is what good government means. The Bill is no incredibly...

Orders of the Day — Regulatory Reform Bill [Lords] (19 Mar 2001)

Dr Mo Mowlam: It would take more than the Bill to increase dancing and gambling. Even though I have doubts about some forms of gambling, I think that dancing and fun are good for our society. The estimated compliance costs for the measures that I outlined are nil. As well as looking at where we can simplify or streamline regulations, we are also considering how to improve enforcement. Sensible...

Orders of the Day — Regulatory Reform Bill [Lords] (19 Mar 2001)

Dr Mo Mowlam: If the hon. Gentleman wants me to cite the Conservative party's record, he will find that he is not in a strong position to criticise. Digby Jones of the Confederation of British Industry said: The Bill has the potential of providing he tools to deliver real benefits to business".

Orders of the Day — Regulatory Reform Bill [Lords] (19 Mar 2001)

Dr Mo Mowlam: No. The Federation of Small Businesses believes that the Bill will be useful in helping to reduce the overall burden on business". Sir Jeremy Beecham of the Local Government Association has given strong support for the powers in the Bill and its potential for reducing the burden of central regulation on local authorities". We value those expressions of support, but the real test for the Bill...

Cabinet Office: Drug Arrest Referral Schemes (14 Feb 2001)

Dr Mo Mowlam: There is clear evidence that arrest referral schemes work. For example, in Barnsley, the custody sergeant's promotion of the scheme has helped to accelerate take-up, and drug users not previously in touch with services are being reached. There has been a steady increase in the number of people seen for initial assessment, and a high rate of those attending for drug treatment. Areas where...

Cabinet Office: Drug Arrest Referral Schemes (14 Feb 2001)

Dr Mo Mowlam: I certainly recognise what my hon. Friend says—helping young people stay off drugs and giving them support once they have finished treatment is crucial. The best approach to ensuring that that care is provided is to make certain that the partnership that developed during the arrest referral continues afterwards. I hope that system is working in Barnsley; as my hon. Friend pointed out, I...

Cabinet Office: Drug Arrest Referral Schemes (14 Feb 2001)

Dr Mo Mowlam: As I have just said, where the schemes are working, there is already a real decrease in crime. Arrest referral schemes are being rolled out across the country at present and, by the end of this year-definitely by next year—we hope that most areas will have them. The schemes bring results.


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