Results 1–20 of 3667 for (in the 'Commons debates' OR in the 'Westminster Hall debates' OR in the 'Lords debates' OR in the 'Northern Ireland Assembly debates') speaker:Edward Garnier

Prisons and Courts Bill (20 Mar 2017)

Edward Garnier: I begin by declaring an interest not only in the subject that we are discussing, and not only in that I am a trustee of the Prison Reform Trust and a patron of Unlock—those two charities are concerned with criminal justice and prisons in particular—but in that I am on the advisory board of Samaritans, and much of what has been discussed this evening touches upon on its work....

Prisons and Courts Bill (20 Mar 2017)

Edward Garnier: I do not have an argument with that at all. The argument for making our prisons work for the public as a whole, for the victims of crime and for prisoners is not just moral and political, but economic. We push hundreds of millions of pounds into the criminal justice and prison systems, and what do we do with that investment? We produce failure. If the prison system was a business or a...

Prisons and Courts Bill (20 Mar 2017)

Edward Garnier: I agree with my hon. Friend. I have sent plenty of people to prison, some of them for very long periods of time. I wish that we were able to make sure that those who do not need to go to prison, or who need to be sent to another place, such as a mental hospital, could be dealt with in a more sensible, productive, efficient and effective way. The argument is not about whether criminals are...

Prisons and Courts Bill (20 Mar 2017)

Edward Garnier: Or the nearest prison to that Crown court.

Prisons and Courts Bill (20 Mar 2017)

Edward Garnier: They end up in Norwich having been via Maidstone, Lewes, somewhere on the Isle of Wight, somewhere in Dorset, somewhere in Devon, somewhere in Bristol, somewhere in the east midlands and somewhere in the west midlands. They eventually end up in Norwich, from where they are released miles away from their family without having had any contact with them. A prisoner’s medical records and...

Prisons and Courts Bill (20 Mar 2017)

Edward Garnier: Could not those two examples be replicated, but to an even worse degree, in the case of young offenders? Obviously there are fewer young offender institutions than prisons. Youngsters are bussed around in the back of sweatboxes for hours—for hours and hours after court hours—and often do not reach their destination until nearly midnight. That is not a good way to rehabilitate anyone.

Prisons and Courts Bill (20 Mar 2017)

Edward Garnier: My hon. Friend mentioned, correctly, the need for political will. However, if members of the public are asked, individually or on a more organised basis, what they think about the current state of our prisons and what needs to be done within our justice system, they are much more liberal than politicians give them credit for. We need to be braver and get on with this rather than allow...

Prisons and Courts Bill (20 Mar 2017)

Edward Garnier: Will my right hon. Friend give way?

Prisons and Courts Bill (20 Mar 2017)

Edward Garnier: My right hon. Friend is very kind. The Bill says: “The report must set out the extent to which prisons are meeting the purpose mentioned in section A1.” What happens if a prison, or prisons generally, do not meet such a purpose? What will the Secretary of State do about it, what can she do about it, and what will happen if she does not do anything about it because prisoners are...

Turkey: Human Rights and the Political Situation — [Mr Peter Bone in the Chair] (9 Mar 2017)

Edward Garnier: I join the right hon. Member for Enfield North (Joan Ryan) in thanking you for chairing our proceedings, Mr Bone; I also congratulate her on initiating this important debate. It is a given, I think, that Turkey is hugely important to us diplomatically and militarily as an important member of NATO, including as a listening post and airbase—particularly for the United States and...

Oral Answers to Questions — Communities and Local Government: Needs-based Funding Formula (27 Feb 2017)

Edward Garnier: My right hon. Friend will know that one of the local authorities in my constituency, Oadby and Wigston borough council, is in dire financial straits. It has run itself incompetently, with the result that, with a revenue budget of £7 million or £8 million a year, it now plans to have an annual deficit of about £1.5 million. That is small in the great scheme of things, but in...

Criminal Finances Bill: Failure to Prevent an Economic Criminal Offence (21 Feb 2017)

Edward Garnier: My new clause 2 was drafted and tabled before Christmas. Since then, I have had a number of meetings with my hon. Friend the Minister and we have also seen the Ministry of Justice’s call for evidence in relation to corporate criminal liability. In the light of what he has said this afternoon, I beg to ask leave to withdraw the clause. Clause, by leave, withdrawn. New Clause 17

Criminal Finances Bill: Failure to Prevent an Economic Criminal Offence (21 Feb 2017)

Edward Garnier: I beg to move, That the clause be read a Second time.

Criminal Finances Bill: Failure to Prevent an Economic Criminal Offence (21 Feb 2017)

Edward Garnier: I shall be relatively brief in introducing this group of new clauses. In moving new clause 2, which stands in my name and those of a number of hon. Members on both sides of the House and which mirrors new clauses 3, 4, 14 and 15, I want to introduce a debate about the future of corporate criminal liability in this jurisdiction. I must declare an interest, as over the past few years I have...

Criminal Finances Bill: Failure to Prevent an Economic Criminal Offence (21 Feb 2017)

Edward Garnier: Very few. I am diverting myself, because I deliberately said “a cloud in every silver lining” not “a silver lining in every cloud.” The short point is that schedule 17 to the 2013 Act contains about 50 economic and financial criminal offences that can be dealt with through deferred prosecution agreements between either the Crown Prosecution Service or the SFO on the...

Cultural Property (Armed Conflicts) Bill [Lords]: Offence of serious violation of Second Protocol (20 Feb 2017)

Edward Garnier: I thought, listening to all these paeans of praise, that I had wandered into the BAFTAs, but they are well placed, and I congratulate my hon. Friend the Minister. She says it is the first Bill she has conducted through this place as a Minister, and I hope it is not the last. I wish her every success. That having been said, as we used to say, this is not simply formulaic; there is a purpose in...

Cultural Property (Armed Conflicts) Bill [Lords]: Offence of serious violation of Second Protocol (20 Feb 2017)

Edward Garnier: I know I am a treasure, but the Minister is so kind. I will make three quick points, if I may. First, it is important not to confuse evidence for an offence with the definition of an offence. Those are two different legal concepts, and in our enthusiasm to pass this Bill into law, we are in danger of allowing that confusion to remain. Despite the fact that I accept the political reality, I...

Cultural Property (Armed Conflicts) Bill [Lords]: Offence of serious violation of Second Protocol (20 Feb 2017)

Edward Garnier: The Minister’s point is confusing. She says that the examples she gave do not provide reason to suspect. In fact, they provide reason to suspect, but it might be that that suspicion is not true. That is the distinction that the Government fail to understand.

Cultural Property (Armed Conflicts) Bill [Lords]: Offence of serious violation of Second Protocol (20 Feb 2017)

Edward Garnier: Does it follow from what my hon. Friend is saying that he does not know whether any convictions under the statutory instrument have been for the “knowing” or for having “had no reason to suppose”? He does not know either way, does he?

Cultural Property (Armed Conflicts) Bill [Lords]: Offence of serious violation of Second Protocol (20 Feb 2017)

Edward Garnier: My hon. Friend refers to the 2003 Act. She and I will recall that the genesis of the Act was the ministerial advisory panel’s report on illicit trade, which was published in 2000. The report suggested that the gap in the Theft Act 1968 should be filled by what became the 2003 Act and by the “knowing or believing” test for mens rea. Is it not a pity that the Government do not...


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