Results 1–20 of 4211 for speaker:Iain Duncan Smith

Universal Credit Roll-Out (18 Oct 2017)

Iain Duncan Smith: I rise to support my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State, who I thought made an excellent speech. I congratulate him on the courage and the spirit in which he produced his commentary against quite a lot of what is really scaremongering about the way in which the system has been designed. First and foremost, the point I would make about universal credit is that it was designed to simplify...

Universal Credit Roll-Out (18 Oct 2017)

Iain Duncan Smith: I recognise that time is limited, so I will limit the number of times I give way. Universal credit is not just about getting people into work; it is actually about changing lives so that those people are ready and better able to enter work. Why are there monthly payments? The very simple answer is that over 80% and rising of all work is paid monthly, and the figure will soon be close to 90%....

Universal Credit Roll-Out (18 Oct 2017)

Iain Duncan Smith: I will give way to other Members in a minute, but let me make a second point. When it comes to housing, why do we want people to pay their rent, rather than always have it paid for them directly? There is a simple answer. All too often, housing associations and local authorities receive the money directly, but then do very little for the tenants. They often know very little about their...

Universal Credit Roll-Out (18 Oct 2017)

Iain Duncan Smith: I will give way in a minute. That is why universal support—now bringing in councils—will identify such people and help them. That is the purpose of universal credit.

Universal Credit Roll-Out (18 Oct 2017)

Iain Duncan Smith: I thank my hon. Friend for that intervention.

Universal Credit Roll-Out (18 Oct 2017)

Iain Duncan Smith: It is not a theory, but I will come on to that in a minute. The right hon. Gentleman and I have had plenty of conversations and discussions about the structure of this, and I want to take him up on that point. I want to make the point, which is not often referred to by Labour Members, that the whole nature of the roll-out was deliberately set so as not to repeat the grave mistakes made when...

Universal Credit Roll-Out (18 Oct 2017)

Iain Duncan Smith: No, because I am conscious that others want to speak, but I will come back to the hon. Gentleman in a minute. I recall that my surgery was full of people who, under the tax credit changes, found they had no money at all. When Labour rolled out tax credits in a big bang, over 750,000 people ended up with no money at all. Since then, the thresholds have had to be raised dramatically to get...

Universal Credit Roll-Out (18 Oct 2017)

Iain Duncan Smith: I will give way in one second. The roll-out of universal credit has been deliberately designed—it is called “Test, learn and rectify”—so that, as it happens, we can identify where there are issues, rectify them and then carry on rolling it out. I want to give an example of why stopping the roll-out now will not work. One area that we discovered early on is that...

Universal Credit Roll-Out (18 Oct 2017)

Iain Duncan Smith: I will come to that. The hon. Gentleman should not worry—I will not resile from why I resigned. Too much of the debate has been based on evidence that is months old, when rectification has taken place and changes have been made. Let me give an example that has not been mentioned. The mistakes in tax credits and housing benefit mean that more than 60% of those coming on to universal...

Universal Credit Roll-Out (18 Oct 2017)

Iain Duncan Smith: I am grateful to my right hon. Friend, who has borne the years better than me. However, I will do anything for a kind look—[Laughter.] Particularly from my right hon. Friend. It is interesting that, in the past 24 hours, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation has made the following statement: “Universal credit has the potential to dramatically improve the welfare system, which is...

Universal Credit Roll-Out (18 Oct 2017)

Iain Duncan Smith: I thought that was a reference to the hon. Gentleman’s speaking ability in the House. Universal credit is a huge driver for positive change that, as the Joseph Rowntree Foundation said, will not just get people into work quicker, but help us identify those in deep difficulty and change their lives. That is the critical element that I hope will unite the House on what universal credit is...

Universal Credit Roll-Out (18 Oct 2017)

Iain Duncan Smith: I apologise, but I am about to conclude. Universal credit is the single biggest change to the welfare system. Those who care about it know that it is capable of dramatically changing lives for the better. My party should be proud of it. I will therefore not support the motion because it intends to stop the roll-out and damage universal credit for short-term political reasons. We should resist...

Nuclear Safeguards Bill (16 Oct 2017)

Iain Duncan Smith: rose—

Nuclear Safeguards Bill (16 Oct 2017)

Iain Duncan Smith: The hon. Lady is going on and on, as is her wont, about the Government not giving the Opposition enough time or opportunities to vote against their proposals. There will, however, be a vote tonight on this Bill, so will the Opposition vote for or against it?

Nuclear Safeguards Bill (16 Oct 2017)

Iain Duncan Smith: I congratulate my right hon. Friend on pursuing this issue with calm and decency. Will he take the opportunity to reflect on some of the scare nonsense that we heard earlier, particularly with regards to medical radioisotopes? That was front page—it was said that people would not be able to get their treatment—but nothing at all in our decision would ever stop the export of any of...

Oral Answers to Questions — Prime Minister: Engagements (11 Oct 2017)

Iain Duncan Smith: On Monday, my right hon. Friend was clear about her negotiations, saying that it remains the Government’s priority to get a very good free trade arrangement with our European friends and partners before we leave. She also made it clear that, alongside that, we would make plans and all necessary arrangements to depart under World Trade Organisation terms should no such agreement be...

Uk Plans for Leaving the EU (9 Oct 2017)

Iain Duncan Smith: I warmly welcome the statement by my right hon. Friend and very good friend, our Prime Minister, on her plans for the negotiations. May I press her and ask her to elaborate a little further? In her statement, she made it clear that the ball was back in the EU’s court. Is it not reasonable to expect that, given all the negotiations and discussions and the progress that has been made, the...

European Union (Withdrawal) Bill (7 Sep 2017)

Iain Duncan Smith: This intervention is not about the Elephants Preservation Act 1879. Does my right hon. Friend not agree that the most complex area here is within the remit of the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, because so much of it was run by the European Union? Many of those laws will need to be changed and added to, and that is why some of the powers in the Bill are necessary.

European Union (Withdrawal) Bill (7 Sep 2017)

Iain Duncan Smith: I hesitate to ask my hon. Friend to give way, but simply want to make the point that as he will recall, during Maastricht we were told time and time again that although we had long procedures for debate the outcome could not be in doubt, because to be a member of the European Union meant that all of what was agreed in the Maastricht treaty would come straight into UK law regardless of what...

European Union (Withdrawal) Bill (7 Sep 2017)

Iain Duncan Smith: I will endeavour to be brief. In rising to support the Bill in principle and in many cases in fact, I also offer my support to my right hon. Friend the Member for Haltemprice and Howden (Mr Davis). He remembers that in the lead-up to the Maastricht debate, we had quite a long Second Reading.


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