Results 141–160 of 3400 for speaker:Mr Denzil Davies

Business of the House (29 Nov 2001)

Mr Denzil Davies: My right hon. Friend was asked by the shadow Leader of the House about next Thursday's debate on the motion for the Adjournment, which will be fairly specific because it relates to the common fisheries policy. I think that I heard that there will be a debate on Wednesday on something that is perhaps less specific, described as European affairs. Previously when we have debated European affairs...

Orders of the Day — Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Bill — [2nd Allotted Day]: Clause 47 — Use etc. of nuclear weapons (26 Nov 2001)

Mr Denzil Davies: As I was a shadow defence spokesman many years ago, I sit up when I see the words "use of nuclear weapons". Clause 47 seems to make it a prima facie offence—a term that I use advisedly, as there are later exceptions—to have nuclear weapons in one's possession. If there were no exceptions, presumably even a Government who have nuclear weapons in their possession would be guilty of an...

Orders of the Day — Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Bill — [2nd Allotted Day]: Clause 38 — Religious hatred offences (26 Nov 2001)

Mr Denzil Davies: My right hon. Friend will know that the word "incitement" does not appear in any of the legislation. Does he accept that one problem is that section 18(1) of the Public Order Act has two separate limbs? The first refers to intention, but the second refers merely to likelihood. If my right hon. Friend seeks amelioration, and possibly a compromise, would he consider dropping the second limb, so...

Orders of the Day — Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Bill — [2nd Allotted Day]: Clause 38 — Religious hatred offences (26 Nov 2001)

Mr Denzil Davies: Although I agree in general with the gist of the hon. Gentleman's argument, he might be surprised to hear that, on the question of religion and what it means, British courts have found it easy to define and describe religion. It is defined as a belief in a supreme being or a God and a worship of that supreme being or God. Whether the platonic first cause comes into it may be something for the...

Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Bill: Clause 106 — Bribery and corruption: foreign officers etc. (21 Nov 2001)

Mr Denzil Davies: Will the hon. Gentleman tell us why he wants prosecutions to be brought only with the Attorney-General's consent?

Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Bill: Clause 106 — Bribery and corruption: foreign officers etc. (21 Nov 2001)

Mr Denzil Davies: There may be only a few cases, but is not there a case in principle for asking the Attorney-General to make a report to the House of Commons on the exercise or non-exercise of his discretion?

Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Bill (21 Nov 2001)

Mr Denzil Davies: I am grateful to my right hon. Friend. I am not criticising him when I say that I do not really understand. Apparently there were some powers that were there before SIAC was established, and we are now taking those from the air, or somewhere, and bringing them back. That may be the case, but I will avail myself of my right hon. Friend's kind offer, and if his lawyers, who I am sure are worthy...

Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Bill (21 Nov 2001)

Mr Denzil Davies: I shall briefly raise what may appear to be a somewhat technical point concerning clause 25. Amendments have been tabled to clause 25, but I do not wish to discuss them. The only question that I have for the Home Secretary relates to the primary legislation, if I may refer to it in that way—the Special Immigration Appeals Commission Act 1997. My right hon. Friend said that he had read the...

Orders of the Day — National Health Service Reform and Health Care Professions Bill (20 Nov 2001)

Mr Denzil Davies: I will address my brief remarks to the specific parts of the Bill that deal with Wales. Health is a devolved responsibility and the National Assembly for Wales does not have the power to introduce primary legislation, so we have to legislate in the Bill to enable the Assembly to fill in the details by subordinate legislation. I do not share the enthusiasm of the hon. Member for Brecon and...

World Trade Conference (15 Nov 2001)

Mr Denzil Davies: Will my right hon. Friend say when negotiations on reducing export subsidies on agricultural products are likely to start, who will be negotiating on behalf of the United Kingdom and whether there is some deadline for them to end to prevent the French dragging them out ad infinitum?

Written Answers — Home Department: Asylum Seekers (15 Nov 2001)

Mr Denzil Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many applications for political asylum in the United Kingdom were made in the three months to (a) 1 October 2001 and (b) 1 October 2000.

Oral Answers to Questions — Treasury: September 11 (8 Nov 2001)

Mr Denzil Davies: Will my right hon. Friend the Chancellor ask the Governor to carry out a study into the financial difficulty of waging war that faces a country that does not have sole control over its currency or over the central bank, and if the power to borrow is restricted by treaty?

Gibraltar (7 Nov 2001)

Mr Denzil Davies: My right hon. Friend said twice that the status quo was unsustainable. Does status quo involve sovereignty?

Coalition Against International Terrorism (1 Nov 2001)

Mr Denzil Davies: It is almost four weeks since the United States and its allies commenced military action in Afghanistan, and the initial concern among Members on both sides of the House was that the United States' response would be indiscriminate. That has not been the case. Although there has been inexcusable imprecision in some of the bombing, the response, in the main, has been proportionate and measured....

Coalition Against International Terrorism (1 Nov 2001)

Mr Denzil Davies: No. I am sorry, but I do not have the time to do so. The United States is perceived as the great Satan. There is a rather simplistic conviction, in my view, that if the United States were to withdraw its support from Israel the conflict in the middle east would end. I do not believe that the United States or the European states could withdraw from that part of the world—the historical,...

Orders of the Day — European Communities (Amendment) Bill — [4th Allotted Day] (17 Oct 2001)

Mr Denzil Davies: I do not know when my right hon. Friend came to this House, but she will remember—or, if not, she will be able to read about it in Hansard—that the Single European Act was constantly opposed by the then Opposition from both the Front and Back Benches.

Orders of the Day — European Communities (Amendment) Bill — [4th Allotted Day] (17 Oct 2001)

Mr Denzil Davies: My right hon. Friend the Minister dealt mainly with enlargement. and I do not criticism him for that. The Bill is, technically, the vehicle by which the provisions of the treaty of Nice will be incorporated into UK domestic law. Like most European treaties that we sometimes debate, the Nice treaty continues and accelerates the process of European integration and the transfer of power from the...

Orders of the Day — European Communities (Amendment) Bill — [4th Allotted Day] (17 Oct 2001)

Mr Denzil Davies: I did not say that it had not; I am merely relating my remarks to the treaty. My hon. Friend knows that it grants powers of veto to the European Parliament. It also removes powers of veto from this Parliament and affects the way in which the Government cast their votes in the Council of Ministers. The European Parliament gains powers of veto while this House loses powers of veto. The European...

Orders of the Day — European Communities (Amendment) Bill — [4th Allotted Day] (17 Oct 2001)

Mr Denzil Davies: I will finish my argument. The veto exists to bridge the gap between decisions taken globally, internationally or supranationally and the needs and requirements of accountability and local and national democracy. That is why most international or supranational institutions require the unanimity rule. In these days, when that gap is getting wider, surely it is a retrograde step to try to do...

Orders of the Day — European Communities (Amendment) Bill — [4th Allotted Day] (17 Oct 2001)

Mr Denzil Davies: My argument is that when a nation state is represented in a supranational body, the rule of unanimity generally applies. I was merely saying that the reason for that is to keep a link between the democracy of the nation state and decisions taken globally that may be in the interests of more than one country. That is why it is preferable that there should be a rule of unanimity in those cases....


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