Results 761–780 of 976 for speaker:Professor Ross Cranston

Oral Answers to Questions — Solicitor-General: Persistent Young Offenders (21 Oct 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: As with all parts of the CPS, there is now joined-up government. The CPS works with the courts and police. I understand that, in Humberside recently, a conference was specifically devoted to bringing the different agencies together to deal with problems such as youth justice. In the next couple of months, I will visit my hon. Friend's area. I invite her to come with me to raise any concern...

Oral Answers to Questions — Solicitor-General: Persistent Young Offenders (21 Oct 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: I hope that the hon. Gentleman is able to calculate delays in youth justice better than he is able to count months. Nevertheless, the Government are reducing the time required by the youth justice system. When we were elected, it took more than four and a half months to bring a persistent youth offender before the courts. That time has been reduced substantially—in some areas, it is already...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Fraud Cases (1 Jul 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: The Attorney-General and I meet the Director of the Serious Fraud Office on a regular basis to discuss the operational work of the office, and on an ad hoc basis as issues require. In the past 12 months, the Serious Fraud Office has brought 19 cases against 39 defendants, of whom 32 were convicted. The overall conviction rate in each year since 1996–97 has been in excess of 80 per cent.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Fraud Cases (1 Jul 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: As I said, the Serious Fraud Office has a very good record. It was not involved in the case of Nick Leeson because he was prosecuted in Singapore. If my hon. Friend is asking me whether people should profit from doing wrong, my reply is that as a general principle they should not. My hon. Friend may know that my right hon. and learned Friend the Attorney-General has taken proceedings against...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Fraud Cases (1 Jul 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: I am not aware of the particular statistics to which the hon. Gentleman refers, but I shall certainly look into the problem. Insider dealing is a difficult offence to prosecute as it is particularly difficult to obtain evidence. Under the new regime in the Financial Services and Markets Bill, the regulatory authorities will be able to take disciplinary action, but at the end of the day...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Fraud Cases (1 Jul 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: The Serious Fraud Office will continue to prosecute the most serious fraud and cases will be referred to it by the regulatory authorities. Of course, under the new regime more cases should be pursued as a result of the activities of the Financial Services Authority. So as a result of the Bill, a more efficient regime will be in place.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Lenient Sentences (Appeals) (1 Jul 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: In 1998 in England and Wales, 94 individual references were made to the Court of Appeal and 88.1 per cent. of the references heard resulted in an increased sentence. Eleven cases have yet to be heard. This year, as of the end of June, 54 cases have been referred to the Court of Appeal. Of the 12 cases that have been heard, the sentence was increased in 10 cases.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Lenient Sentences (Appeals) (1 Jul 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: In our manifesto, we undertook to look into that matter, and we have done a great deal of preliminary work. I hope that an announcement will be made in the fairly near future. The previous Government made two minor extensions to the Criminal Justice Act 1988, but experience has shown that not many references have been made. Most of those that arise are for truly serious offences, but...

New Schedule 1: Public Notaries: Abolition of Scriveners' Monopoly (22 Jun 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: I cited a leading Court of Appeal decision, which the hon. Gentleman should read closely.

New Schedule 1: Public Notaries: Abolition of Scriveners' Monopoly (22 Jun 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: Yes, it is 1973, Queen's Bench. The hon. Member for Beaconsfield (Mr. Grieve) should receive reassurance from that.

New Schedule 1: Recipients of Disability Working Allowance (22 Jun 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: I beg to move amendment No. 33, in page 22, line 4, leave out 'disability working allowance' and insert 'disabled person's tax credit'.

New Schedule 1: Recipients of Disability Working Allowance (22 Jun 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: These technical amendments arise from the inter-relationship between this Bill and the Tax Credits Bill. As currently drafted, clause 32 of this Bill amends the Legal Aid (Scotland) Act 1986 to allow advice and assistance to be provided, without a means test or contributions, to recipients of disability working allowance. That is already the case for recipients of family credit. It is also...

New Schedule 1: Public Notaries: Abolition of Scriveners' Monopoly (22 Jun 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: It is always a pleasure to listen to the right hon. Member for Cities of London and Westminster (Mr. Brooke) and to learn a little more history, both generally and about the Brookes. However, the Government will resist the clause. I should explain briefly the background to the issue as it may not be familiar to every hon. Member. Notaries authenticate certain legal documents, mainly for use...

New Schedule 1: Public Notaries: Abolition of Scriveners' Monopoly (22 Jun 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: I give advice to the Government, not to private individuals. However, I urge the society to examine that section of the 1968 Act closely, as its authority bears directly on the matter raised.

Clause 11: Costs in Funded Cases (22 Jun 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: I beg to move amendment No. 12, in page 9, line 32, leave out 'cases in which services have been' and insert 'relation to proceedings in which services are'.

Clause 11: Costs in Funded Cases (22 Jun 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: This group of drafting amendments is consequential to an amendment made in Committee to what is now clause 11(1). Clause 11 deals with the award of costs between the parties in cases involving community legal service funding. It gives assisted persons broadly the same statutory protection against costs as exists now. Clause 11(1) was amended in Committee to provide for that protection to be...

Clause 22: Position of Service Providers and Other Parties (22 Jun 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: I beg to move amendment No. 18, in page 16, line 17, leave out second 'of' and insert 'to'.

Clause 22: Position of Service Providers and Other Parties (22 Jun 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: This group of amendments clarifies the powers to prescribe the procedures for courts carrying out functions under part I of the Bill, particularly in relation to granting rights to representation in criminal cases. It also includes a number of consequential and drafting amendments. Let me explain. Amendment No. 19 provides a general power to prescribe which member or officer of a court is...

Schedule 1: Legal Services Commission (22 Jun 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: I beg to move amendment No. 38, in page 65, line 28, leave out ', with the approval of the Treasury,'.

Schedule 1: Legal Services Commission (22 Jun 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: You will be pleased to know, Mr. Deputy Speaker, that the purpose of these seven amendments is to remove the requirement for Treasury consent or approval to arrangements for the pay, pensions and compensation of members and staff of the Legal Services Commission. The amendments reflect the fact that it is no longer the practice for new legislation to make pay and pensions provisions for...


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