Results 161–180 of 976 for speaker:Professor Ross Cranston

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Child Prostitution (12 Nov 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: I thank my hon. Friend for her kind remarks. As she said, we have adjoining constituencies and I will take her up on her invitation. The pilot in Wolverhampton last year and early this year has had a beneficial effect in that only 10 out of 66 children identified have returned to prostitution. More importantly, as my hon. Friend rightly said, the pilot has led to the prosecution of...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Child Prostitution (12 Nov 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: As the hon. Lady knows, that is a matter for a free vote. The current law covers only soliciting by girls, so we need to address the problem of prostitution by boys. She will also be aware that the Government have sexual offences under review. I hope that my right hon. Friend the Home Secretary will introduce proposals for reforming the law in the coming year.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Human Rights Act (17 Dec 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: The contents of the Human Rights Act were discussed extensively among Ministers in the preparation of the Government's White Paper, in the process of drafting the Bill and during debates in Parliament. The provisions relating to declarations of incompatibility, although complex, are an important and central part of the legislation. Ministers are satisfied with the Act and in particular with...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Human Rights Act (17 Dec 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: This country has been an adherent to the European convention on human rights since 1951. All Governments have complied with their international obligations. The legislation that they have introduced has in their view been compliant with the law. Occasionally, courts may decide that there is non-compliance and in future there may be declarations of incompatibility under the provision but, on...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Human Rights Act (17 Dec 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: That section was a neat solution to the problem of parliamentary sovereignty—it retains parliamentary sovereignty. The courts cannot strike down legislation under section 4. Obviously, we are still obliged to comply with our international obligations under the convention, and we shall do so.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney — General: Pro Bono Work (4 Feb 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: My right hon. and learned Friend the Attorney-General and I are very supportive of pro bono work. My right hon. and learned Friend is a member of the advisory board of the Bar's pro bono unit and we have both attended functions to foster the work of the solicitors pro bono group. We are also keen to encourage Government lawyers who wish to participate in pro bono work, such as assisting at...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney — General: Pro Bono Work (4 Feb 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: My hon. Friend knows that the Access to Justice Bill is currently in the other place. We are hoping that it will be speedily dealt with there and then come here. He is right to say that the same principles underlie that Bill and our encouragement of pro bono work. We do not regard the encouragement of pro bono work as a substitute for the public provision of legal services. It is additional...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney — General: Prosecutions (Juveniles) (4 Feb 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: The Government are committed to reduce by half—from 142 days to 71—the average time taken to deal with persistent young offenders. More than 150 youth court areas have fast-tracking schemes in operation, covering almost half the courts in England and Wales. Before May 1997, only eight youth court areas were covered. Tough performance targets have been set for all stages of criminal...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney — General: Prosecutions (Juveniles) (4 Feb 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: I am pleased to have the hon. Gentleman's support. When we came into office, we inherited an appalling mess. It took four and a half months before persistent young offenders were dealt with. In some areas, good progress has been made. In north Hampshire, for example, the time taken is down to 61 days from four and half months, but I do not pretend that the targets will all be achieved...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney — General: Prosecutions (Juveniles) (4 Feb 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: I thank my hon. Friend for his interest. Late last year, non-statutory performance targets were adopted. For youth courts those targets are: from arrest to charge—two days; charge to first appearance—seven days; first appearance to start of trial—28 days; verdict to sentence—14 days. As I said earlier, we are trying to reduce the overall average to 71 days from the four and a half...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Serious Fraud Office (11 Mar 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: The Attorney-General and I meet the Director of the Serious Fraud Office regularly. We also meet on an ad hoc basis when circumstances determine.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Serious Fraud Office (11 Mar 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: My hon. Friend will know that, as a result of the comprehensive spending review, £5.6 million extra has been allocated to the SFO for the next three years. The SFO works with the police; it depends on the police referring cases. The two work together; police officers work with the SFO. The SFO deals with complex and multi-disciplinary fraud, and is doing so successfully. Its conviction rate...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Serious Fraud Office (11 Mar 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: The hon. Gentleman will be very pleased to know that, as a result of the comprehensive spending review agreement between the SFO and the Government, the SFO has determined to reduce average time from accepting a case and completing investigations to 17.5 months, and to reduce to 16 months the average length of prosecution between transfer and committal on one hand and verdict on the other.

Orders of the Day — Access to Justice Bill [Lords] (14 Apr 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: The right hon. and learned Member for North-East Bedfordshire (Sir N. Lyell) started by saying that this has been a good debate. I agree. My hon. Friends participated fully and vigorously and made many good points. Initially, we were disappointed because it looked as though the main Opposition party would field only two Back Benchers, but the hon. Member for Solihull (Mr. Taylor) was...

Orders of the Day — Access to Justice Bill [Lords] (14 Apr 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: On the whole, my hon. Friends welcome the Bill. I will come to some of the points raised. I hope that I am addressing some of their concerns. Let me make a further point about conditional fees in relation to uplift. Under our proposals, the uplift will be recoverable from the losing party. That means that losing parties will be much more willing to challenge the level of uplift than are...

Orders of the Day — Access to Justice Bill [Lords] (14 Apr 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: I shall make the insurance point in relation to personal injury. As my hon. Friend the Minister of State said, the evidence is that insurers are coming forward. We hope that insurance will further develop. My hon. Friend the Member for Upminster mentioned insurance for a legal health check, and that would be welcome. Conditional fee agreements are taking off. There have been more than 50,000...

Orders of the Day — Access to Justice Bill [Lords] (14 Apr 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: I have very limited time and there are many points to cover. I am sorry, but I cannot give way. With a mixed system, there is no danger of a wholly state-employed defender system. What is more, salaried defenders will be subject not only to the normal ethical codes, but, under the Bill, to duties to the courts and to their clients. I doubt whether a salaried lawyer in the public service is...

Orders of the Day — Access to Justice Bill [Lords] (14 Apr 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: My hon. Friend makes an important point about human rights. We have said that public interest cases will be addressed much more seriously under this Bill than they have been hitherto. The community legal service will provide help where there is no such assistance at present. It is a radical new approach. It will be flexible, it will work in partnership with funders and other providers of...

Oral Answers to Questions — Crown Prosecution Service (22 Apr 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: There is a continuing interest in the restructuring of the Crown Prosecution Service. The Attorney-General and I regularly receive inquiries from people—including hon. Members—about the service. The Glidewell report on the CPS made a number of recommendations aimed at improving the efficiency of the service. Additionally, the Government decided to restructure the CPS into 42 geographical...

Oral Answers to Questions — Crown Prosecution Service (22 Apr 1999)

Professor Ross Cranston: On the whole, cases moves quickly through the CPS. However, the hon. Gentleman has a valid point in relation to the handling of victims and the relations of victims. Sir lain Glidewell made a specific recommendation about that—one of a handful of recommendations on which we have not yet reached a final decision. We have accepted the principle that the matter must be dealt with much more...


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