Results 141–160 of 976 for speaker:Professor Ross Cranston

Orders of the Day — Finance (No. 2) Bill: Repeals (1 Jul 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: A number of my hon. Friends refuted the intervention by the hon. Member for Banff and Buchan (Mr. Salmond), who has wandered in and out of the Chamber at various times this afternoon and this evening, but has not stayed around to hear our responses. He asked what the Finance Bill does for manufacturing, which is important to my constituency. Historically, the black country has been a great...

Orders of the Day — Finance (No. 2) Bill: Repeals (1 Jul 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: I could not agree more with my hon. Friend. The Opposition focused on some specific points and did not seem to see the big picture. In a recent summary of some 10 studies that assessed the impact of corporation tax and capital gains tax on investment, Mr. Jack Mintz states The overall conclusion one derives from recent studies is that taxes affect investment decisions". Conservative Members...

Orders of the Day — Finance (No. 2) Bill: Repeals (1 Jul 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: Yes, as my hon. Friend reminds me, it was a world of great wealth—

Orders of the Day — Finance (No. 2) Bill: Repeals (1 Jul 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: Of auctions and large investments, and that is not the world of the average voter, who is more concerned with measures in the Bill aimed at introducing a fairer regime, which will benefit the average person. No Conservative Member mentioned the important provisions on transfer pricing as regards the activities of transnational companies and there was little mention of the provisions to deal...

Orders of the Day — Finance (No. 2) Bill: Repeals (1 Jul 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: I agree. The figures demonstrate that inequality grew more in this country than in any other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development country, apart from New Zealand, which was a scandal. In Committee, we heard a great deal from Conservative Members about the legislative process; they said that the Government did not listen. The Government do listen. There was extensive...

Orders of the Day — Finance (No. 2) Bill: Repeals (1 Jul 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: That is very good point. The Labour Government are responsible; they consult people and work with business. The Conservative Government did not do that—Conservative Members do not know what consultation is, which is why they cannot understand this Government. Also on legislative form, I want to deal with the canard that we have heard from the Opposition about retrospectivity. People have...

Orders of the Day — Finance (No. 2) Bill: Repeals (1 Jul 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: Thank you, Mr. Deputy Speaker. In creating regulation-making powers, we have been consulting. The draft regulations are available for several months, so that the business community and professional bodies that will be affected by them can give their comments. The Bill fosters enterprise; it introduces stability; it facilitates altruism in the way that I suggested; and it puts in place...

Oral Answers to Questions — Agriculture, Fisheries and Food: Abattoirs (2 Jul 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: What assessment he has made of the effect of the publication of hygiene scores for abattoirs. [47165]

Oral Answers to Questions — Agriculture, Fisheries and Food: Abattoirs (2 Jul 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: I thank my hon. Friend for that reply. Will he confirm that Britain is the only country in Europe that publishes individual scores? With the aim of propagating that information more widely, will he tell us where the best and worst abattoirs in the country are?

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Serious Fraud Trials (2 Jul 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: What analysis he has made of the use of juries in serious fraud trials. [47147]

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Serious Fraud Trials (2 Jul 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: I thank my right hon. and learned Friend for that reply. Is he aware of the view recently expressed by the head of the Serious Fraud Office that some fraud trials are incapable of being handled by a jury? In considering that view, will he weigh against it the idea that technological developments have made it possible to simplify cases so that they can be more easily expressed to a jury,...

Orders of the Day — Human Rights Bill [Lords]: Freedom of Expression (2 Jul 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: I want to make a few remarks about the way in which the new clause reconciles the rights to freedom of speech and to the protection of private and family life. Both rights are important. Freedom of speech, in a way, encapsulates our vision of democracy; it is essential to our democratic procedures. If we do not have freedom of speech, we cannot operate our democratic mechanisms. The...

Orders of the Day — Human Rights Bill [Lords]: Freedom of Expression (2 Jul 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: The hon. and learned Gentleman is absolutely right—the rights are qualified. Indeed, as I said at the outset, rights are always qualified. We are considering how the new clause can deal with a conflict between two rights. I shall come back to some of his remarks, as I do not agree that the new clause achieves nothing. We tend to ignore the jurisprudence of the German courts, but they have,...

Oral Answers to Questions — Minimum Sentences (Burglary) (13 Jul 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: Is not this point a bit rich coming from the Conservative party when burglary increased by more than 120 per cent. in the 18 years after 1979? It is a cardinal principle of our system that people should be subjected only to penalties that are commensurate with the circumstances of the crime, taking into account the victim's circumstances and the impact on the victim's family, for example....

Oral Answers to Questions — Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs: BBC World Service (14 Jul 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: What steps he is taking through the grant-in-aid to enable the BBC World Service to provide a multimedia service. [48715]

Oral Answers to Questions — Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs: BBC World Service (14 Jul 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: I know from his earlier answers that my right hon. Friend considers the BBC World Service to be one of the country's most important resources, and that he will not allow the damage to be repeated. May I ask a specific question about television services? As my right hon. Friend may know, Voice of America offers some six foreign language services, and Deutsche Welle some three. Will my right...

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade and Industry: British Industry (16 Jul 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: If she will make a statement about her Department's policy on increasing the productivity of British industry. [49376]

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade and Industry: British Industry (16 Jul 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: I congratulate my right hon. Friend on her partnership approach and on bringing industry to the heart of government. Do not the productivity figures produced by Professor Siebert of the Kiel institute in Germany, demonstrating that labour productivity in Britain is only 70 per cent. of that in Germany, give the lie to the Tory Government's claim that they left us a golden economic legacy?...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Child Prostitution (12 Nov 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: Prostitution itself is not a criminal offence. However, a person who loiters or solicits for the purpose of prostitution does commit a criminal offence. There is strong evidence that most young people engaged in prostitution are victims of abuse and exploitation. The primary response, therefore, is to identify a form a diversionary action, which will protect young people from further harm...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Child Prostitution (12 Nov 1998)

Professor Ross Cranston: The hon. Gentleman makes a valid point. The children are victims and the focus of attention should be on those who abuse and coerce them. I congratulate the police, who, in the past year, have done ground-breaking work on the matter. The Association of Chief Police Officers guidelines, which emphasise diversion, have been piloted in Wolverhampton and Northampton. The Government will prepare,...


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