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Results 1–20 of 486 for speaker:Dr Peter Brand

Opposition Day: Pensioners (17 Jan 2000)

Dr Peter Brand: I am listening with great interest. Does not the hon. Gentleman share the Prime Minister's confidence that we shall continue to become a wealthier nation? Is he betraying the tendency that I so often see in older people—that of not recognising when a rainy day has arrived? The plight of pensioners is now such that they are in the rain and should be helped.

Opposition Day: Pensioners (17 Jan 2000)

Dr Peter Brand: Has my hon. Friend come across one of the consequences of privatising home care? Many pensioners now have to pay VAT on the services that they receive at home. Is it not disgraceful that the Government penalise pensioners twice?

Opposition Day: Health Care (18 Jan 2000)

Dr Peter Brand: Did my hon. Friend notice that, towards the end of the Secretary of State's speech, he refused to take interventions? The one matter of substance in his speech was the undertaking to increase spending by 5 per cent.—per cent. of what he did not define. Might it be helpful if my hon. Friend explored what the baseline of the 5 per cent. is and accepted an intervention from the Secretary of...

Opposition Day: Health Care (18 Jan 2000)

Dr Peter Brand: Will not the health authorities that received the lowest uplift in their funding for next year find it particularly difficult to pay the salary increases? They will have to make cuts in services rather than just failing to advance them.

Opposition Day: Health Care (18 Jan 2000)

Dr Peter Brand: Will the hon. Gentleman give way?

Medical Treatment (Prevention of Euthanasia) Bill (28 Jan 2000)

Dr Peter Brand: Will the hon. Lady give way?

Medical Treatment (Prevention of Euthanasia) Bill (28 Jan 2000)

Dr Peter Brand: I congratulate the hon. Member for Congleton (Mrs. Winterton), not only on coming top of the ballot but on her choice of the subject of her Bill and, indeed, its title. For some weeks prior to its publication, I was in some difficulty as to the reply I should send to the many constituents and organisations that wrote to me about it. There is no doubt that the practice of medicine is...

Medical Treatment (Prevention of Euthanasia) Bill (28 Jan 2000)

Dr Peter Brand: That is an extremely good question. I think that the answer is that I allowed death to occur. That is the nub of the argument. To assume that medical intervention can guarantee life or death is nonsense. That assumes that doctors have powers that they do not possess. It assumes powers of prognostication that doctors do not have. I do not know which of the Members now in the Chamber will drop...

Medical Treatment (Prevention of Euthanasia) Bill (28 Jan 2000)

Dr Peter Brand: Quite. I may be faced with an elderly lady who I know has been very unhappy over the past five years, who has been increasingly confused and who is finding life a real burden. If that lady develops bronchopneumonia and I know that she does not want any further treatment because we have talked about the matter, and I withhold antibiotics, I might have made an assumption that if I treated that...

Medical Treatment (Prevention of Euthanasia) Bill (28 Jan 2000)

Dr Peter Brand: That is no reason to respect me.

Medical Treatment (Prevention of Euthanasia) Bill (28 Jan 2000)

Dr Peter Brand: That is a good point. There is a distinct difference between medical interventions in the sense of giving antibiotics, performing operations, putting people on a heart-lung machine, putting up drips and all that sort of paraphernalia, and basic care—for example, keeping people warm, keeping them supported and making sure that, even if they are not conscious, there is someone sitting with...

Medical Treatment (Prevention of Euthanasia) Bill (28 Jan 2000)

Dr Peter Brand: With all due respect, to take up that sedentary interjection, the Bill is not clear. The Bill provides that there shall be no omission that will knowingly hasten death.

Medical Treatment (Prevention of Euthanasia) Bill (28 Jan 2000)

Dr Peter Brand: I do not know. I am not a lawyer. As I read the Bill, however, it would prevent just such a thing. An earlier example was the kidney patient on renal dialysis. That patient can refuse further dialysis and therefore choose to die. If that patient cannot make that declaration and goes into a uraemic coma, and if the renal physician had been aware of his feelings but the patient had not been...

Medical Treatment (Prevention of Euthanasia) Bill (28 Jan 2000)

Dr Peter Brand: That was a good intervention, but it does not relate to the Bill's contents, which cover "medical treatment", which is a wide term. The Bill does not specify uncomfortable, intrusive or unexceptional treatment. Another misapprehension relates to the clinician's motivation in making the decision. The people who drafted the Bill believe that doctors are cleverer than they are. I cannot know...

Medical Treatment (Prevention of Euthanasia) Bill (28 Jan 2000)

Dr Peter Brand: The Bill hinges on motivation and purpose. That makes the meaning extraordinarily difficult to tease out in a court of law. One can always claim, "I knew there was a likelihood of this person dying, but that was not my primary purpose." That takes us back to the secondary purpose argument.

Medical Treatment (Prevention of Euthanasia) Bill (28 Jan 2000)

Dr Peter Brand: I intended to mention that as I wound up. I, like other hon. Members, speak as an individual on a private Member's Bill. We are considering an important subject, which is a matter of personal conscience, and we have different views.

Medical Treatment (Prevention of Euthanasia) Bill (28 Jan 2000)

Dr Peter Brand: I would have had some sympathy for that point if the Bill had been drafted in a slightly broader way.

Medical Treatment (Prevention of Euthanasia) Bill (28 Jan 2000)

Dr Peter Brand: The Bill is not amendable because its premise is that acts of omission equal acts of commission. A Bill on euthanasia, which spelt out clearly what could not be done, would have been great. We could then have argued whether omission and commission were the same, and whether basic hydration and food constitute treatment. However, we have missed an opportunity.

Medical Treatment (Prevention of Euthanasia) Bill (28 Jan 2000)

Dr Peter Brand: The Bill states clearly that action by the person responsible for the care of the patient is unlawful if his purpose or one of his purposes in doing so is to hasten or otherwise cause the death of the patient. The hon. Member for Congleton equates that to murder. I am, therefore, a multiple murderer under the terms of the Bill. When I had been qualified for a couple of years, I worked as a...

Medical Treatment (Prevention of Euthanasia) Bill (28 Jan 2000)

Dr Peter Brand: That is an extremely valuable intervention and I look forward to it being expanded in a speech. [HON. MEMBERS: "In Committee."] That is up to the House. May I respond to the very valid question that was raised? There is no doubt that there is a need for clearer guidelines, but they must be guidelines and they must be worked through, and not from the particular narrow point of view that all...


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