Results 141–160 of 4922 for speaker:Hugh Bayley

Orders of the Day — Non-Domestic Rating Bill (12 Jan 1994)

Hugh Bayley: That is certainly true of some businesses and properties, but for other properties the new revaluation level will be considerably higher than the existing uniform business rate, involving transitional relief rebates. Unless the transitional relief regime continues for some years, to ensure that the rate bills of businesses do not rise from, say, £20,000 to £40,000—unless the system...

Orders of the Day — Non-Domestic Rating Bill (12 Jan 1994)

Hugh Bayley: The Bill would certainly give the Government the power to roll forward transitional relief. I am asking for a political commitment that they will use that power to protect businesses in my constituency—and, indeed, in the constituencies of other hon. Members.

Orders of the Day — Non-Domestic Rating Bill (12 Jan 1994)

Hugh Bayley: I make no apology for speaking in a wholly partisan fashion on behalf of the small businesses in my constituency, because in York the revaluation in 1990 hit harder than in any other district council in the country. The average revaluation was a 15·5 times increase—higher than anywhere else. The combination of the 1990 revaluation and the introduction of the uniform business rate was a...

Orders of the Day — Non-Domestic Rating Bill (12 Jan 1994)

Hugh Bayley: That is an interesting point. One of our reasons for giving the hon. Member for Newbury (Mr. Rendel) such a hard time is the fact that—apart from the Minister who opened the debate—he is the only non-Labour Member who has spoken so far. Obviously, we must attack the hon. Gentleman; we have no one else to attack. Now that my hon. Friend the Member for Normanton (Mr. O'Brien) has set me...

Orders of the Day — Non-Domestic Rating Bill (12 Jan 1994)

Hugh Bayley: I am more than happy to give way to the Chancellor if he wants to give that support to small businesses and economic recovery. However, like other Conservative Members, he seems a little tongue-tied today. The Government say that transitional relief is needed this year because the recession is not yet over. The transitional relief scheme is structured so that the money goes to all businesses...

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Sunday Trading (13 Jan 1994)

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many additional police officers he estimates will be rostered for duty on Sundays as a result of the partial deregulation of Sunday trading.

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Sunday Trading (13 Jan 1994)

Hugh Bayley: Does the Minister accept that it will be necessary to roster additional police officers, environmental health officers, street cleaners and trading standards officers to police Sunday trading? Who will pay for them?

Education (19 Jan 1994)

Hugh Bayley: Will the hon. Gentleman give way?

Education (19 Jan 1994)

Hugh Bayley: Did the Minister hear the Chief Secretary to the Treasury's recent statement that students should perhaps pay course and examination fees? That would obviously limit access to higher education. On behalf of his Department, will the Minister specifically rule out the possibility that students might be made personally liable to pay course fees?

Oral Answers to Questions — Transport: Channel Tunnel (24 Jan 1994)

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport which English regions he expects to benefit most from rail traffic carried by the channel tunnel.

Oral Answers to Questions — Transport: Channel Tunnel (24 Jan 1994)

Hugh Bayley: Freight services are due to begin running through the channel tunnel in about six weeks' time. Why is it that seven years after the channel tunnel project was announced, when the French Government have managed to build a fast rail link from Paris to the channel tunnel, the British Government are only today publishing tentative proposals for the route, let alone introducing an Act of...

Orders of the Day — Sunday Trading Bill: Discrimination Against Prospective Employees Who Object to Sunday Working (9 Feb 1994)

Hugh Bayley: I am grateful to the hon. Gentleman for giving way because I know that he is having a rough ride. I do not ask him to give way merely to interpret the flow of his thoughts. He seems to be suggesting that employers will find it possible to staff their shops with volunteers on Sundays and will therefore be willing to employ someone who refuses to work on a Sunday. I know of a director of a shop...

Orders of the Day — Sunday Trading Bill: Discrimination Against Prospective Employees Who Object to Sunday Working (9 Feb 1994)

Hugh Bayley: The Bill was given a Second Reading on the clear understanding that no shopworker would face discrimination if he or she refused to work on a Sunday. That anti-discrimination commitment was not what the Government wanted. They wanted protection for existing shop workers, but no protection for future shop workers. The Government's consultation document in July said: The Keep Sunday Special...

Orders of the Day — Sunday Trading Bill: 'Right to double-time payments (9 Feb 1994)

Hugh Bayley: I regret that the House voted at Second Reading to give the public the right to shop in any shop whose owners wished it to open for a six-hour period on Sunday. The House voted to allow the big chain stores to obtain a greater market share and to make bigger profits, at the expense of smaller businesses, some of which will go out of business if the Bill is passed. I shall speak briefly on...

Orders of the Day — Tobacco Advertising Bill (11 Feb 1994)

Hugh Bayley: I am sure that my hon. Friend is aware that, in the conclusion to the report, Clive Smee, the Government chief health economist, said: The balance of evidence thus supports the conclusion that advertising does have a positive effect on consumption. He reviewed the position in other countries and concluded: In each case the banning of advertising was followed by a fall in smoking on a scale...

Orders of the Day — Tobacco Advertising Bill (11 Feb 1994)

Hugh Bayley: Is the right hon. Gentleman aware that, in their "Health of the Nation" programme, the Government have set a target of reducing the number of cigarettes sold from 98 billion in 1990 to, I believe, 57 billion in 2000? The Secretary of State for Health, in setting that target, must have spoken to the Chancellor and explained to him the tax implications of the Government's policy for reducing...

Orders of the Day — Tobacco Advertising Bill (11 Feb 1994)

Hugh Bayley: Will the hon. Gentleman give way?

Orders of the Day — Tobacco Advertising Bill (11 Feb 1994)

Hugh Bayley: Could the hon. Gentleman possibly give way?

Orders of the Day — Tobacco Advertising Bill (11 Feb 1994)

Hugh Bayley: One year ago, Kirklees council conducted research on the effects of the "Reg" campaign among young people. In a sample of young people aged between 14 and 15, 43 per cent. said that the "Reg" advertisements would make them more likely to smoke, while 5 per cent. said that the advertisements would make them less likely to smoke. The research was done long before the Health Education Authority...

Orders of the Day — Tobacco Advertising Bill (11 Feb 1994)

Hugh Bayley: Does the Minister agree that factors that dissuade people from taking up smoking tend to reinforce themselves? In families where neither parent smokes, there will be strong pressure on the children not to smoke. Therefore, those children will be less susceptible to the effects of tobacco advertising. All the evidence shows that those who are most affected by advertising are those who grow up...


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