Robert Goodwill

Conservative MP for Scarborough and Whitby

@transportgovuk

Bankers' Bonus Tax

There have been votes in Parliament on the level of taxation applied to Banker' Bonuses. In 2009 a one-off 50% tax on on any individual discretionary bonus over £25,000 paid to a banker was levied and there have been a number of votes since on reintroducing such a tax.

Photo: bram_souffreau

Robert Goodwill almost always voted against a banker’s bonus tax

TheyWorkForYou has automatically calculated this MP’s stance based on all of their votes on the topic. You can browse the source data on PublicWhip.org.uk.

Major votes

Scoring Agreements

Agreements are when Parliament takes a decision without holding a vote.

This does not necessarily mean universal approval, but does mean there were no (or few) objections made to the decision being made.

No scoring agreements are part of this policy while this member was elected.

Minor votes

  • On 17 Apr 2013: Robert Goodwill voted against consideration of a new tax on bankers' bonuses. Show vote
  • On 3 Jul 2012: Robert Goodwill voted against requiring a report on a tax on Bankers' Bonuses, including on how the revenue raised could be spent to create jobs. Show vote
  • On 18 Apr 2012: Robert Goodwill voted against requiring the chancellor to review the possibility of reintroducing a tax on bankers' bonuses and how the revenue raised could be spent on tackling unemployment. Show vote
  • On 23 Jan 2012: Robert Goodwill voted against urgent action to kickstart the economy to promote jobs and growth, against a tax on bankers' bonuses and against the government funding 100,000 jobs for young people. Show vote
  • On 13 Jul 2011: Robert Goodwill was absent for a vote on Youth Employment Bill — Youth Training and Employment — Bank Bonus Budget Tax Show vote
  • On 5 Jul 2011: Robert Goodwill acted as teller for a vote on Finance Bill — Clause 73 — Tax on Bankers' Bonuses Show vote

Informative Agreements

Agreements are when Parliament takes a decision without holding a vote.

This does not necessarily mean universal approval, but does mean there were no (or few) objections made to the decision being made.

No informative agreements are part of this policy while this member was elected.

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For an explanation of the vote descriptions please see our page about voting information on TheyWorkForYou.

Profile photo: © Parliament (CC-BY 3.0)