Prayers - [Mr Speaker in the Chair]

– in the House of Commons on 4th February 2022.

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Votes in this debate

  • Division number 184
    A majority of MPs voted not to hold a private session of the House of Commons.

Photo of Jonathan Gullis Jonathan Gullis Conservative, Stoke-on-Trent North

I beg to move, That the House sit in private.

Question put forthwith (Standing Order No. 163)

Division number 184 Motion to Sit in Private

A majority of MPs voted not to hold a private session of the House of Commons.

Aye: 0 MPs

No: 44 MPs

Ayes: A-Z by last name

Tellers

Nos: A-Z by last name

Tellers

Absent: 601 MPs

Absents: A-Z by last name

The House divided: Ayes 0, Noes 45.

Question accordingly negatived.

Photo of Sarah Jones Sarah Jones Shadow Minister (Home Office)

On a point of order, Mr Speaker, I want to raise comments made on Monday by the Prime Minister, who I believe inadvertently mislead the House. On Monday 31 January, the Prime Minister said in this place that

“we have been cutting crime by 14%”.—[Official Report, 31 January 2022; Vol. 708, c. 24.]

Again on Monday, he said:

“What we are actually doing is cutting crime by 14%”.—[Official Report, 31 January 2022; Vol. 708, c. 50.]

The Prime Minister was referring to the national crime statistics, which were published on 27 January.

In a letter to Mr Carmichael, the UK Statistics Authority said that

“the Prime Minister referred to a 14% reduction in crime, which is the change between the year ending September 2019 and the year ending September 2021. This figure also excludes fraud and computer misuse, though the Prime Minister did not make that clear. If fraud and computer misuse are counted in total crime as they should be, total crime in fact increased by 14% between the year ending September 2019 and the year ending September 2021.”

The ministerial code states:

“It is of paramount importance that Ministers give accurate and truthful information to Parliament, correcting any inadvertent error at the earliest opportunity.”

It seems clear that the Prime Minister inadvertently mislead the House, and I would be grateful for your advice, Mr Speaker, on how he might at the earliest opportunity correct the record.

Photo of Lindsay Hoyle Lindsay Hoyle Speaker of the House of Commons, Chair, Speaker's Committee for the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority, Chair, Speaker's Committee for the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority, Chair, House of Commons Commission, Chair, Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, Chair, Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission

First, may I say I am grateful to the hon. Lady for giving notice of her point of order? She may be aware that the issue was raised by Wendy Chamberlain yesterday. I repeat what was said in response to that point of order. Although the Chair is not responsible for the content of contributions made by Ministers, I am sure that the concern was heard by those on the Treasury Bench. If an error has been made in this instance, I am sure that the Prime Minister will seek to correct it as quickly as possible. She will no doubt also be aware of paragraph 8.15 of the ministerial code, which deals with the use of statistics. I am sure she will find ways of pursuing this issue, should she wish to do so.