Technology in Schools: Learning Legacy

Education – in the House of Commons on 1st March 2021.

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Photo of Sheryll Murray Sheryll Murray Conservative, South East Cornwall

What steps his Department is taking to ensure that new uses of technology and the Government’s provision of additional computers to schools leave a legacy for future learning.

Photo of Gavin Williamson Gavin Williamson The Secretary of State for Education

Technology has been essential to teaching remotely, and I pay credit to the entire education workforce for doing this. In the longer term, it has the potential to improve pupil outcomes and operational efficiency. We are building on our significant investment in devices, training and digital services to create a lasting digital legacy.

Photo of Sheryll Murray Sheryll Murray Conservative, South East Cornwall

What work has my right hon. Friend’s Department undertaken to look at using virtual platforms, with which children are now familiar, to set up international meetings to help improve foreign language skills and knowledge of different cultures?

Photo of Gavin Williamson Gavin Williamson The Secretary of State for Education

My hon. Friend raises an important opportunity with this new access to technology—access to technology that so many children have benefited from —and making sure that it lasts for a long time. We have invested £4.3 million in supporting schools to get on to new digital platforms, and we very much hope that they really take the opportunity to use these platforms to get the very best for their students.

If I may, however, I will also give a little plug for the new Turing scheme. The Turing scheme will not be about visiting people digitally, but—and this is hard to imagine, as it seems such a long time since we were able to enjoy foreign travel—about enabling children to visit different destinations right around the globe and to learn languages in person, as well as through a digital platform.