Criminal Offences (Police Officers)

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General – in the House of Commons at 12:00 am on 17th February 1997.

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Photo of Nick Ainger Nick Ainger , Pembroke 12:00 am, 17th February 1997

To ask the Attorney-General what reports the Crown Prosecution Service has received relating to allegations of police officers being involved in protecting illegal Jamaican immigrants from deportation and prosecution for criminal offences. [14435]

Photo of Mr Derek Spencer Mr Derek Spencer , Brighton, Pavilion

The Crown Prosecution Service has received no reports about criminal offences alleged to have been committed by police officers in the type of matters referred to by the hon. Gentleman.

Photo of Nick Ainger Nick Ainger , Pembroke

Is the Solicitor-General aware of the case of Delroy Denton, a yardie who came into this country illegally, was known to the immigration service as an illegal immigrant and was then run as an informer by Metropolitan police officers? Is he aware that Mr. Denton raped a 15-year-old girl while serving as an informant of the Metropolitan police, that he was released in very unusual circumstances and that he later raped and murdered another woman, leaving two children orphaned? Is he aware that no Metropolitan police officer or Home Office immigration official has been disciplined? Does he agree that that is outrageous, and that there should be a full inquiry into those matters?

Photo of Mr Derek Spencer Mr Derek Spencer , Brighton, Pavilion

The place for such allegations to be investigated is in the courts. The cases of Denton and others, which were referred to in the article to which the hon. Gentleman refers, are still going through the courts. They are not yet completed, and they are sub judice. I should tell him that "information received"—as it is usually referred to—is a very powerful investigation and prosecution tool in the criminal courts. Without it, justice would not be served.