Vickers

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General – in the House of Commons at 12:00 am on 22nd January 1996.

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Photo of George Galloway George Galloway , Glasgow Hillhead 12:00 am, 22nd January 1996

To ask the Attorney-General if he will ask the Director of Public Prosecutions to call for a report on the memorandum of 6 September 1995 written by Sir Colin Chandler, chief executive of Vickers, to his fellow executive David Hastie; and if he will make a statement. [8858]

Photo of George Galloway George Galloway , Glasgow Hillhead

The cynical and casual attachment to the principles of British law implicit in that most cynical of answers is probably why this will be the last time that we shall see the Attorney-General in his current position. The Vickers memorandum catches the chief executives of Vickers and British Aerospace red handed as accomplices before the fact of a conspiracy against Mohammed al-Masari, a refugee living lawfully and peacefully in this country. If not kidnapping and murder, what could the executives have been referring to when they used the cynical and chilling phrases, "stifle him personally" and "direct intervention against him"? Why have not those executives explained their words? Why have they gone to ground so shamefacedly? Why is the discredited Attorney-General covering up for them today?

Photo of Sir Nicholas Lyell Sir Nicholas Lyell Attorney General (Law Officers)

The House might think that the hon. Gentleman is talking nonsense. If he seriously thinks that there are any grounds for suggesting that there has been criminality in relation to that memorandum, he will no doubt report it to the police.

Photo of Mr John Marshall Mr John Marshall , Hendon South

Does my right hon. and learned Friend agree that the professor enjoys the hospitality of this country and should not behave in a way that puts jobs for people in this country at risk?

Photo of Sir Nicholas Lyell Sir Nicholas Lyell Attorney General (Law Officers)

My right hon. and learned Friend the Home Secretary is fully entitled to take foreign affairs considerations and the relationship with important allies into account in making his decisions.