Crown Prosecution Service

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General – in the House of Commons at 12:00 am on 24th April 1995.

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Photo of Mr Jeff Rooker Mr Jeff Rooker , Birmingham, Perry Barr 12:00 am, 24th April 1995

To ask the Attorney-General in how many instances in 1994 the Crown Prosecution Service offered no evidence when a case came to trial. [18743]

Photo of Sir Nicholas Lyell Sir Nicholas Lyell Attorney General (Law Officers)

During 1994, the Crown Prosecution Service brought cases to a conclusion by offering no evidence in 2.7 per cent. of cases before the magistrates court and 7.3 per cent. of cases before the Crown court. These figures do not include other methods of discontinuance.

Photo of Mr Jeff Rooker Mr Jeff Rooker , Birmingham, Perry Barr

Does the Attorney-General accept that one of those cases before the Crown court involved my constituent, Mr. "D", who had to put up with a two-year nightmare for him and his family, facing six charges, some of which involved forgery, and on all of which no evidence was offered and Judge Cole declared that a not guilty verdict be ordered? Will the Attorney-General ask the appropriate authorities to re-examine my constituent's case from start to finish, with a view to ascertaining whether his former employers, ADT Auctions plc, were not involved in a conspiracy to pervert the course of justice, as the case was started at that company's instigation?

Photo of Sir Nicholas Lyell Sir Nicholas Lyell Attorney General (Law Officers)

I am grateful to the hon. Gentleman for giving me notice that he was going to raise a particular case of concern to his constituents. That case was reviewed. The House will take an interest in the fact that it is the Crown Prosecution Service's duty to keep a case under review at all stages. That duty is sometimes criticised, but it was exercised in the case of his constituent. As a result, no evidence was offered. I make it clear that that means that the gentleman left the court without a stain on his character. I shall invite the CPS to have another look at the matter in so far as that is appropriate.

Photo of Nigel Waterson Nigel Waterson , Eastbourne

Will my right hon. and learned Friend confirm that figures are actually falling in other categories of reasons for discontinuance of trials? Should not that obvious trend be warmly welcomed?

Photo of Sir Nicholas Lyell Sir Nicholas Lyell Attorney General (Law Officers)

My hon. Friend is right. Some two or three years ago, the discontinuance level caused concern to the House. Since then, the proportion of cases that are discontinued in the magistrates courts has fallen from 13.3 per cent. in 1992, to 12.8 per cent. in 1993 and to 11.7 per cent. in 1994.