Industrial Disputes

Oral Answers to Questions — Employment – in the House of Commons at 12:00 am on 2nd May 1972.

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Photo of Mr John Hunt Mr John Hunt , Bromley 12:00 am, 2nd May 1972

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many stoppages of work due to industrial disputes have been recorded by his Department since 1st January, 1972, and how this figure compares with the same period in each of the past five years.

Photo of Mr Maurice Macmillan Mr Maurice Macmillan , Farnham

448 in the three months ending 31st March, 1972. For corresponding periods in earlier years the figures are: 1971–627; 1970–1,212; 1969–718; 1968–518; and 1967–529.

Photo of Mr John Hunt Mr John Hunt , Bromley

Do not those very encouraging figures indicate that, far from increasing militancy, as was predicted, the effect of the Industrial Relations Act has been and will increasingly be to strengthen the hands of the moderates in the trade union movement?

Photo of Mr Maurice Macmillan Mr Maurice Macmillan , Farnham

Certainly I hope that that will be the case, and there is a very big reduction in the number of stoppages in 1972 compared with 1971 and 1970.

Photo of Mr Reginald Prentice Mr Reginald Prentice , East Ham North

The figures would be different if they were expressed in terms of days lost. Will the right hon. Gentleman accept that the figures for he coming weeks and months will depend largely on whether he succeeds in avoiding a national dock strike and that therefore I appeal to him urgently to respond to Mr. Jones's request for a meeting to discuss containerisation and other questions? Will the right hon. Gentleman see that that meeting takes place this week, irrespective of what is happening in the Industrial Relations Court?

Photo of Mr Maurice Macmillan Mr Maurice Macmillan , Farnham

In 1972 the number of days lost was higher than in recent years. In 1971, 86 per cent. of days lost were accounted for by two stoppages —in the Post Office and the Ford Motor Company. In 1972, 86 per cent. of the days lost were accounted for by the national coal mining stoppage. The number of actual stoppages, which the Donovan Commission emphasised was a most important indication of unrest in industry, is substantially down. I have replied to Mr. Jones's letter and I have indicated that I am very anxious to talk to him about the longer-term aspects of the difficulties in the docks, as indicated in his letter to me.