Redundancy Payments Bill

Oral Answers to Questions — Ministry of Labour – in the House of Commons at 12:00 am on 10th May 1965.

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Photo of Mr Frank Allaun Mr Frank Allaun , Salford East 12:00 am, 10th May 1965

asked the Minister of Labour if he will take steps to prevent certain employers from deliberately dismissing workers before the Redundancy Payments Bill becomes operative in order to avoid such payments.

Photo of Mr Richard Marsh Mr Richard Marsh , Greenwich

My right hon. Friend does not expect that this will be a serious problem but he will watch the situation.

Photo of Mr Frank Allaun Mr Frank Allaun , Salford East

I thank the Parliamentary Secretary for that Answer. To prevent this kind of victimisation taking place, will he do everything possible to get the Bill through and into operation quickly? Could he give the House any idea how soon this will be?

Photo of Mr Richard Marsh Mr Richard Marsh , Greenwich

I am afraid it would be impossible to give a clear indication of when we can put the Bill into operation without knowing how much obstruction there will be from right hon. and hon. Members opposite.

Photo of Sir Ronald Bell Sir Ronald Bell , Buckinghamshire South

While no one wants victimisation, would it really serve the economic purpose of the country if men were retained for an indefinite period in employment after any useful function they could perform had disappeared?

Photo of Mr Richard Marsh Mr Richard Marsh , Greenwich

I cannot see the point of the question. [HON. MEMBERS: "Answer it."] Hon. Members Miss the point. If I cannot see the point of a question, it is difficult to answer it.

Photo of Captain Walter Elliot Captain Walter Elliot , Carshalton

Has the hon. Gentleman any evidence at all that employers are carrying out this sort of action?

Photo of Mr Richard Marsh Mr Richard Marsh , Greenwich

No. At the moment we have no evidence that redundancies are being created for this reason. My right hon. Friend would be reluctant to take any action unnecessarily which could prevent the scheme beginning in an atmosphere of trust. I repeat what I said at the beginning—my right hon. Friend is watching the position and if any evidence were to come to light he would certainly look at it.