Married Quarters

Oral Answers to Questions — British Army – in the House of Commons at 12:00 am on 11th December 1957.

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Photo of Mr Norman Dodds Mr Norman Dodds , Erith and Crayford 12:00 am, 11th December 1957

asked the Secretary of State for War how many married quarters have been built at Aldershot since 1st January, 1950; and what are the plans for the future in this respect.

Photo of Mr Julian Amery Mr Julian Amery , Preston North

188 married quarters have been built in this period and 250 more converted or modernised. Further work is in progress, but I am not yet in a position to say what the final numbers will be.

Photo of Mr Norman Dodds Mr Norman Dodds , Erith and Crayford

Does the hon. Gentleman not appreciate how disappointing this figure is after seven years? Is it to be wondered at that there is difficulty in getting Regulars for thy Army? Is not this one of the reasons why the decision to abandon National Service is in great danger?

Photo of Mr Julian Amery Mr Julian Amery , Preston North

The hon. Member can be assured that we fully appreciate the importance of building the maximum number of married quarters as soon as we can. He will also appreciate that the average in this locality he mentions has not been below the general average for the country.

Photo of Mr Reginald Sorensen Mr Reginald Sorensen , Leyton

asked the Secretary of State for War how many new homesteads have been provided for married soldiers and their families during the past five years; what is the total amount of domestic accommodation now available for this purpose in this country; and to what extent proposals to provide modern accommodation have now been implemented.

Photo of Mr Julian Amery Mr Julian Amery , Preston North

I have taken the whole of the hon. Member's Question to refer to the United Kingdom. A total of 4,896 married quarters for officers and other ranks have been built in the last five years; and the total number now available is 27,942. We have completed more than three-quarters of the programme of new building which was launched in 1949 and we have, in addition, modernised or converted more than 2,000 old married quarters.

Photo of Mr Reginald Sorensen Mr Reginald Sorensen , Leyton

Does that mean that accommodation will now be available for all married soldiers who need it?

Mr. Amory:

No, Sir. I think it would be over-ambitious to say that all needs are catered for, but we are pressing on to meet the full requirements of the Army as soon as possible.