Only a few days to go: We’re raising £25,000 to keep TheyWorkForYou running and make sure people across the UK can hold their elected representatives to account.

Donate to our crowdfunder

Accidents in the Home

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department – in the House of Commons at 12:00 am on 6th June 1957.

Alert me about debates like this

Photo of Mr Somerville Hastings Mr Somerville Hastings , Barking 12:00 am, 6th June 1957

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people were killed and how many injured by electrocution through accidents in the home in 1955 and 1956, respectively; and what steps are being taken to avoid such accidents.

Photo of Mr R.A. Butler Mr R.A. Butler , Saffron Walden

The numbers of fatal electrical accidents in the home in 1955 and 1956 were 39 and 55, respectively. No information is available regarding non-fatal accidents. Safety requirements are incorporated in British Standards Specifications covering a considerable range of electrical appliances for use in the home, and the Institute of Electrical Engineers has for many years issued regulations for the electrical equipment of buildings.

Photo of Mr Somerville Hastings Mr Somerville Hastings , Barking

Does the right hon. Gentleman not realise that the numbers he has given me are unnecessarily high? Is he aware that there is an increasing use of electricity for all sorts of work in connection with the home, and would it not be worth while having an inquiry into the question whether more cannot be done to prevent these accidents? Is he aware that minor accidents, not resulting in death, are relatively common in connection with electrical equipment?

Photo of Mr R.A. Butler Mr R.A. Butler , Saffron Walden

Yes, Sir, I am aware of that. I will watch the situation, but I think that, in view of the steadily increasing number of electrical appliances, the accidents are not increasing in ratio to the expansion. Nevertheless, I am taking every care to watch this.