Migration

Oral Answers to Questions — Commonwealth Relations – in the House of Commons at 12:00 am on 27th January 1955.

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Photo of Sir Jocelyn Lucas Sir Jocelyn Lucas , Portsmouth South 12:00 am, 27th January 1955

asked the Under-Secretary of State for Commonwealth Relations what arrangements he has made with each of the Dominions to allow unrestricted emigration of British nationals from Great Britain and Northern Ireland irrespective of health; and how far these arrangements prescribe standards of financial circumstances and the necessity of being of good character.

Photo of Sir Douglas Dodds-Parker Sir Douglas Dodds-Parker , Banbury

No such arrangements have been made with other member countries of the Commonwealth. The relevant requirements of these countries in regard to immigrants from the United Kingdom vary very considerably.

Photo of Sir Jocelyn Lucas Sir Jocelyn Lucas , Portsmouth South

Is the Minister aware that at present there is nothing to prevent any Dominion or Colony from exporting their criminals here as a cheap way of getting rid of them, and that we cannot possibly send them back? Could we have Empire free trade or modified restrictions?

Photo of Sir Douglas Dodds-Parker Sir Douglas Dodds-Parker , Banbury

That is not a matter for which my Department is responsible.

Mr. Dugdale:

asked the Under-Secretary of State for Commonwealth Relations on what grounds he is unwilling to hold discussions with the Government of the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland on the subject of immigration from the United Kingdom to these Territories.

Photo of Sir Douglas Dodds-Parker Sir Douglas Dodds-Parker , Banbury

As I informed the right hon. Gentleman on 16th December, I am willing at any time to discuss with the Federal Government any aspect of immigration into the Federation, should they so wish.

Mr. Dugdale:

Is the hon. Gentleman not aware that there is grave disquiet at the increasing South African immigration into these Territories, and in view of the effect that this may have on the native inhabitants of Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland, for whom the United Kingdom Government are responsible, will he consult the Federation Government as to what steps can be taken to prevent this?

Photo of Sir Douglas Dodds-Parker Sir Douglas Dodds-Parker , Banbury

Immigration into the Federation is entirely a matter for the Government of the Federation, as was decided by Parliament.

Photo of Mr James Johnson Mr James Johnson , Rugby

Is the hon. Gentleman aware of the intense land-hunger by the Africans in Nyasaland, particularly in the Southern Province, and will he bear in mind in future discussions the matter of the quota of Europeans entering that Colony?

Photo of Sir Douglas Dodds-Parker Sir Douglas Dodds-Parker , Banbury

No, Sir. That again is entirely a matter for the Government of the Federation. The land hunger in Southern Nyasaland is partly due to the immigration from non-British territories.

Mr. Dugdale:

I am perfectly well aware that immigration is a matter for the Federation, but I ask the hon. Gentleman to discuss this matter with them, in view of the fact that the protection of native interests is a matter for the United Kingdom Government.

Photo of Sir Douglas Dodds-Parker Sir Douglas Dodds-Parker , Banbury

Yes, Sir. But it does not come under the heading of immigration, which is entirely a matter for the Federal Government.