Territorial Waters (Three-Mile Limit)

Oral Answers to Questions — Germany – in the House of Commons at 12:00 am on 8th December 1954.

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Photo of Mr Henry Usborne Mr Henry Usborne , Birmingham, Yardley 12:00 am, 8th December 1954

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs with what countries the United Kingdom has concluded agreements limiting their territorial waters to three miles; and what steps he is taking to obtain the concurrence of all maritime States to the establishment of the three-mile limit universally.

Photo of Mr Anthony Eden Mr Anthony Eden , Warwick and Leamington

The limitation of territorial waters has not been the subject of formal agreement between Her Majesty's Government and any other State. Her Majesty's Government regard the three-mile limit as sanctioned in international law by long usage and custom. Her Majesty's Government have accordingly always refused to accept in principle claims to territorial waters of more than three miles, and have reserved the right to uphold any British interests prejudiced by such claims.

As regards the second part of the Question, Her Majesty's Government have confirmed their refusal to accept the extension of territorial waters outside a three-mile limit to the International Law Commission. This panel of distinguished jurists appointed by the United Nations—is now engaged on codifying international law on the régime of the territorial sea. The Commission's report will in due course be submitted to the United Nations General Assembly for approval.

Photo of Mr Henry Usborne Mr Henry Usborne , Birmingham, Yardley

In view of the great importance of getting this business of territorial limits settled at an early date, how soon does the right hon. Gentleman think the report will go to the United Nations? Will he then propose that the United Nations should try collectively to agree to a definite territorial limit as being one recognised throughout the world?

Photo of Mr Anthony Eden Mr Anthony Eden , Warwick and Leamington

I agree with the hon. Member's supplementary question. So far as we are concerned, the sooner the panel of distinguished jurists report the better we shall be pleased. Our endeavour will be to get the matter before the United Nations on the basis of that report as soon as possible.

Photo of Mr Henry Usborne Mr Henry Usborne , Birmingham, Yardley

How soon will that be? Will it be a matter of a year?

Photo of Mr Anthony Eden Mr Anthony Eden , Warwick and Leamington

It is difficult for me to say how long a panel of international jurists will take. I am neither international nor a jurist, but I shall do my best to convey to them the wish of this House that the sooner they act the better this House will be pleased.

Photo of Mr John Tilney Mr John Tilney , Liverpool Wavertree

As the freedom of the seas is of paramount interest to this country, and as it is possible for oil and other minerals to be discovered more than three miles away from any national shore, would my right hon. Friend agree that it might be a reasonable solution to put ocean beds more than three miles from any nation's shore under the jurisdiction of the United Nations?

Photo of Mr Anthony Eden Mr Anthony Eden , Warwick and Leamington

I should like to see that Question on the Order Paper.