Oral Answers to Questions — War Criminals, Spandau

– in the House of Commons at 12:00 am on 3rd May 1954.

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Photo of Mr Marcus Lipton Mr Marcus Lipton , Lambeth Brixton 12:00 am, 3rd May 1954

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs what progress has been made in the four-Power talks about the future treatment of Nazi war criminals at Spandau gaol.

Photo of Mr Selwyn Lloyd Mr Selwyn Lloyd , Wirral

I am glad to say that four-Power agreement has been reached on certain changes in the regulations governing Spandau gaol. An agreed communiqué was accordingly issued in Berlin on 29th April, which I am circulating in the OFFICIAL REPORT.

Photo of Mr Marcus Lipton Mr Marcus Lipton , Lambeth Brixton

Is the right hon. and learned Gentleman satisfied that the representations made by the British Government have been accepted by the other Powers? Is it not becoming increasingly obvious that these war criminals are not likely to serve the sentences originally imposed on them?

Photo of Mr Selwyn Lloyd Mr Selwyn Lloyd , Wirral

I think that a reasonable settlement has been arrived at.

The following is the text of the communiqué:The fourth in a series of meetings of representatives of the High Commissioners of the four Powers in Germany on the regulations governing the major German war criminals imprisoned in Spandau prison, was held today in Berlin.The delegations were headed by M. Michef Bourely (France), Mr. M. E. Bathurst (United Kingdom), Mr. G. P. Zimin (U.S.S.R.), and Mr. Knox Lamb (United States).On behalf of the High Commissioners of the four Powers in Germany, agreement was reached on certain changes in the regulations governing the prisoners in Spandau Prison.Among other things, the changes include agreement that a prisoner may be removed to the hospital which is nearest to the prison and which is under the jurisdiction of one of the four Powers in the event that he requires complicated treatment or major surgery which cannot be carried out satisfactorily in the prison itself, and that on the death of a prisoner, the body will be buried inside the prison with religious rites and in the presence of the deceased prisoner's near relatives. These relatives will subsequently be allowed opportunities to visit the grave.