Foodstuffs (Personal Imports)

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade and Commerce – in the House of Commons at 12:00 am on 12th May 1953.

Alert me about debates like this

Photo of Sir Edward Keeling Sir Edward Keeling , Twickenham 12:00 am, 12th May 1953

asked the President of the Board of Trade whether he has reconsidered the embargo on the bringing into this country by passengers from the Irish Republic of more than 7 1b. of food.

Photo of Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke , Darwen

asked the President of the Board of Trade whether he will relax some of the detailed restrictions on the amounts of foodstuffs which passengers and crews arriving in this country by sea and air may bring in their baggage without obtaining an import licence.

Photo of Mr Peter Thorneycroft Mr Peter Thorneycroft , Monmouth

I have decided, in consultation with my right hon. Friend the Minister of Food, to abolish the detailed restrictions on the amount of foodstuffs which may be imported as personal effects without an import licence by passengers arriving from all countries by sea and air, and to simplify them for crews arriving by sea and air. The only provisos are now the following. Uncooked meats covered by the Diseases of Animals Act cannot be imported. The Customs officer at the port of arrival must be satisfied that the quantities of foodstuffs are reasonable, and in the case of crews do not exceed 25 1b. in all. He must also be satisfied that the goods are being imported for personal use and not as merchandise or for sale.

Photo of Sir Edward Keeling Sir Edward Keeling , Twickenham

Is my right hon. Friend aware that up to now travellers from every country in the world except Ireland have been allowed to bring in 50 1b. of food, and as it is obviously a good thing that travellers should bring into this country as much food as possible, will he allow me to congratulate him on this removal of the differentiation against travellers from Ireland, and on this further step to freedom?