Germany (British Traffic Rights)

Oral Answers to Questions — Civil Aviation – in the House of Commons at 12:00 am on 2nd July 1952.

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Photo of Mr Ronald Russell Mr Ronald Russell , Wembley South 12:00 am, 2nd July 1952

asked the Minister of Civil Aviation what traffic rights exist for British airlines within the American zone of Germany.

Photo of Mr Reginald Maudling Mr Reginald Maudling , Barnet

B.E.A. have no traffic rights on sectors wholly within the American zone of Germany. B.E.A. have full commercial traffic rights at Frankfurt for services to London and Brussels and at Munich for services to Dusseldorf and London.

Photo of Mr Ronald Russell Mr Ronald Russell , Wembley South

Is it not a fact that the airlines of certain other foreign countries have traffic rights in the American zone; and if so, is it not rather extraordinary that we have not?

Photo of Mr Ian Mikardo Mr Ian Mikardo , Reading South

It is because we are their allies.

Photo of Mr Reginald Maudling Mr Reginald Maudling , Barnet

The whole question of who is to have traffic rights within Germany is settled by a tripartite body on which the United Kingdom Government and the American and French Governments are represented. My right hon. Friend is satisfied that United Kingdom operators are receiving their fair share of operating rights in this respect.

Photo of Mr Ronald Russell Mr Ronald Russell , Wembley South

asked the Minister of Civil Aviation why no traffic rights exist for British European Airways between Frankfurt and Munich.

Photo of Mr Reginald Maudling Mr Reginald Maudling , Barnet

I understand that the Tripartite Civil Aviation Board, representing the Allied High Commission in Germany, was unable to grant British European Airways' application for traffic rights between Frankfurt and Munich, because there are already five airlines operating between these points who provide ample capacity for local travel requirements.