Remploy Factory, Wallsend

Oral Answers to Questions — Employment – in the House of Commons at 12:00 am on 24th July 1951.

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Photo of Mr John McKay Mr John McKay , Wallsend 12:00 am, 24th July 1951

asked the Minister of Labour the hours of work and the wages paid to the workers in the Remploy Factory at Wallsend; and what is the percentage of output expected from these disabled men compared with workers in the ordinary factories.

Mr. Lee:

The hours of work at the Wallsend Remploy Factory are 44 per week and the wages of adult severely disabled workers range from £4 8s. 0d. to £5 10s. 0d. per week. No specific output is laid down for these workers but, while it is Remploy's policy not to make unreasonable demands of them, each is expected to make his maximum contribution to production within the limits of his disability.

Photo of Mr John McKay Mr John McKay , Wallsend

Can the Minister say how the hours, wages and conditions of work are regulated, and by whom?

Mr. Lee:

Not without notice.

Photo of Mr John McKay Mr John McKay , Wallsend

asked the Minister of Labour is he is aware that there is dissatisfaction in the Remploy Factory at Wallsend about the pressure put upon the men to produce a given output regardless of their varied disabilities and skill; and if he will have inquiries made and a report given to the hon. Member for Wallsend.

Mr. Lee:

I have no knowledge of any dissatisfaction among the workers at Wallsend Remploy Factory on the ground that pressure is being put upon them to produce more than their disabilities allow. From inquiries made, I find that two workers complained of the exhibition of a chart illustrating progress of work in each section of the factory intended to enlist their active interest in production, but I understand that trade union representatives who saw it were satisfied with its purpose.

Photo of Mr John McKay Mr John McKay , Wallsend

I asked whether an investigation could be made and a report given. Can that be done?

Mr. Lee:

As I pointed out to my hon. Friend, the charge against which some complaint is made has been shown to the trade union people who represent the workers concerned, and they find no cause for complaint of any sort.