Clause 3. — [General Duty of the Corporation.)

Part of Orders of the Day — Iron and Steel Bill – in the House of Commons at 12:00 am on 25th July 1949.

Alert me about debates like this

Photo of Mr Gilbert Mitchison Mr Gilbert Mitchison , Kettering 12:00 am, 25th July 1949

I do not believe that the Opposition have the faintest idea of what this Amendment means. At any rate, I have not the faintest idea, after hearing four of them talking on it. This is not something that the Government have to do. This is a scheme which the Corporation have to prepare showing the manner in which they propose to exercise the rights conferred on them … If it had stopped there there might have been some sense in the Amendment, but it goes on to say: so as to secure for those companies the largest measure of autonomy consistent with the proper discharge by the Corporation of their duties under this Act. I fail to see what sort of a scheme it is to be and what its purpose is and what it is to be about. One object which it appears to secure for the individual companies is the largest measure of autonomy consistent with the proper discharge by the Corporation of its duties under the Act. How to prepare a scheme to do that is entirely past my understanding and, I believe, of the understanding of the ordinary man in the street, who is supposed to know the law on these matters. Certainly, the scheme as prepared can have no relation whatever to the various schemes I have heard put forward in the last half dozen speeches.