Black-coated Workers (Taxation)

Oral Answers to Questions — National Finance – in the House of Commons on 10th September 1942.

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Mr. De la Bère:

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he will consider granting some form of relief from taxation to the black-coated worker whose salary ranges from £300 to £800 a year, in view of the fact that the majority of these men have had no increase in salary since the outbreak of the war and their expenses have been considerably increased as a result of the war; and whether he will allow them a remission from taxation in connection with their season ticket travelling expenses?

Photo of Sir Kingsley Wood Sir Kingsley Wood , Woolwich West

I am afraid that I can hold out no hope of special taxation relief on the lines that my hon. Friend suggests. I would remind him that Section 26 of this year's Finance Act provided for relief to salaried workers in respect of additional travelling expenses, up to £10 a year, resulting from a change in the place of work or residence owing to the war.

Mr. De la Bère:

Does not my right hon. Friend realise the ever-increasing hardship of these forgotten men, that many of them are family men with obligations and with a status to keep up, and that their position is very acute indeed? Will he really give further consideration to these men, who never get any attention paid to them in the House of Commons? I hope hon. Members will support this demand on behalf of many men who have gone through great hardship after many years of hard work.

Photo of Sir Kingsley Wood Sir Kingsley Wood , Woolwich West

No, Sir. Attention has already been paid to their case in the way that I have indicated, and I regret that we cannot deal with a very large number of similar claims.

Mr. De la Bère:

My right hon. Friend will appreciate that I shall go on and on pressing their case for reconsideration.