Slaugter-Houses (Inspection).

Oral Answers to Questions — Public Health. – in the House of Commons on 30th July 1942.

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Photo of Mr David Adams Mr David Adams , Consett

asked the Minister of Health whether he is aware that the efficient inspection of meat in public and other abattoirs results in the elimination of carcases or parts of the same liable to convey to consumers various diseases; and, as such inspection is not possible in areas where abattoirs do not exist, resulting in the marketing of diseased food, what steps are being taken to meet this situation?

Photo of Mr Ernest Brown Mr Ernest Brown , Leith

I am not aware of the precise circumstances to which my hon. Friend refers. I would point out, however, that notice of intention to slaughter an animal for sale for human consumption is required by the Public Health (Meat) Regulations to be given to the local authority and that under an Order made by my right hon. and Noble Friend the Minister of Food no person may slaughter for human consumption any livestock except in accordance with a licence granted by his Department.

Photo of Mr David Adams Mr David Adams , Consett

Is the Minister aware that owing to the lack of the necessary supervision of slaughter-houses diseased meat is unquestionably being placed on the market? Should it not be the policy of the Ministry to provide at the earliest moment public abattoirs?

Photo of Mr Ernest Brown Mr Ernest Brown , Leith

My understanding of the meat and livestock scheme gives the impression that there are opportunities for the inspection of slaughter-houses. I have inquired from my Noble Friend the Minister of Food, who states that in the opinion of his Ministry's area technical advisers meat inspection, generally speaking, is carried out to a greater extent than in peace-time.

Photo of Mr David Adams Mr David Adams , Consett

But is the Minister aware that there are scattered slaughter-houses in all great centres of population? Where public abattoirs do not exist, supervision is very superficial.

Photo of Mr Ernest Brown Mr Ernest Brown , Leith

That is a general statement, but if the hon. Gentleman has any particular evidence with which to back it up, I would like to consider it, as, I am sure, would my Noble Friend the Minister of Food.