Confidential Reports.

Oral Answers to Questions — Royal Air Force. – in the House of Commons on 29th July 1942.

Alert me about debates like this

Photo of Sir Norman Hulbert Sir Norman Hulbert , Stockport

asked the Secretary of State for Air whether he will revert to the peace-time procedure whereby all annual confidential reports are initialled by the officer reported upon whether adverse or favourable?

Photo of Sir Archibald Sinclair Sir Archibald Sinclair , Caithness and Sutherland

No, Sir. The war-time practice of showing officers their confidential reports only when they contain adverse comment has advantages over the peace-time practice and is in line with that adopted in the Army and in the Royal Navy.

Photo of Sir Norman Hulbert Sir Norman Hulbert , Stockport

Does my right hon. Friend not think it would give great encouragement to junior officers if they could see the reports?

Photo of Sir Archibald Sinclair Sir Archibald Sinclair , Caithness and Sutherland

The public interest, and the interest of the Service, make it necessary that these reports should contain candid and realistic assessments of the officers' character and abilities, and this is best served by the present system.

Photo of Major-General Sir Alfred Knox Major-General Sir Alfred Knox , Wycombe

Are adverse reports always shown to the officer concerned?