Fuel Rationing.

Oral Answers to Questions — Fuel and Power. – in the House of Commons on 23rd June 1942.

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Photo of Mr Ellis Smith Mr Ellis Smith , Stoke-on-Trent Stoke

asked the Minister of Fuel and Power what amount of coal per week he proposes to allow an average family to receive weekly who have little or no stocks?

Major Lloyd George:

My hon. Friend will be aware that it has been decided not to ration domestic fuel at present. There is no question, therefore, at the moment of any weekly allowance of coal for an average family. The purpose of the present restrictions, which, as stated in the White Paper on Coal, are to be continued, is to ensure as fair a spread as possible of the available supplies among those who are able to stock coal and coke, and the limits on what may be acquired in a month do not bear any relation to current consumption at this time of year, which everyone should reduce to the lowest possible figure.

Photo of Mr Ellis Smith Mr Ellis Smith , Stoke-on-Trent Stoke

Can the Minister state quite definitely what is a reasonable amount of coal to be received by the average family?

Major Lloyd George:

It is laid down what the position at the moment is. Controlled premises are not to acquire more than one ton of any kind of coal or coke if the total stock at the beginning of the month did not exceed two tons.

Photo of Mr Ellis Smith Mr Ellis Smith , Stoke-on-Trent Stoke

In view of the fact that there are millions of people who cannot look at tons at all, what is a reasonable amount for the average family to be receiving at present?

Photo of Mr John Wardlaw-Milne Mr John Wardlaw-Milne , Kidderminster

asked the Minister of Fuel and Power when the appeal for the voluntary rationing of fuel will be made?

Major Lloyd George:

As my hon. Friend will be aware, appeals for economy in the use of fuel have been made by the Government for some considerable time. A more intensified campaign will start in a very few days.

Photo of Mr John Wardlaw-Milne Mr John Wardlaw-Milne , Kidderminster

I do not know what my right hon. Friend means by speaking of appeals having been made. There has been no widespread appeal. Do I understand from him that there will be a definite appeal launched by the Government for voluntary rationing in the near future?

Major Lloyd George:

Yes, that is what I do mean. There has been some appeal in the last eight months. A more intensified campaign is being started.

Photo of Mr Emanuel Shinwell Mr Emanuel Shinwell , Seaham

What does the right hon. Gentleman mean by "intensified campaign"? Is it to be conducted on a vast scale; is it to cost money? Could he give us a few of the details of what he means by "an intensified campaign"?

Major Lloyd George:

I think that even the hon. Member can hardly expect to get it for nothing. It is bound to cost some money. By "intensified campaign" I mean making use of every possible means of appealing to the public for fuel economy.