Private Employment Agencies.

Oral Answers to Questions — National War Effort. – in the House of Commons on 26th March 1942.

Alert me about debates like this

Photo of Mr William Craven-Ellis Mr William Craven-Ellis , Southampton

asked the Minister of Labour (1) what representations have been officially made to him by bodies representative of black-coated workers and their employers such as chambers of commerce, regretting the monopoly of Employment Exchange envisaged under the Employment of Women (Control of Engagement) Order No. 100, and asking for its immediate cessation coincident with the cessation of hostilities; and

(2) whether, as the measures restrictive of the normal operation of private employment agents are due to war-time emergency, he will give an assurance of postwar restoration of the status quo as regards employment agents as has been done in the case of trade unions?

Photo of Mr Ernest Bevin Mr Ernest Bevin , Wandsworth Central

I received a letter last December from the London Chamber of Commerce, which did not contest the need for the Order, but expressed the hope that an assurance could be given that the status quo would be restored at the conclusion of hostilities, and that meanwhile some means might be devised for utilising the services of the private employment agencies. The reply made to the Chamber stated that the Order would cease to have effect at the end of the war unless Parliament otherwise determined and that the Minister could not, at this date, bind him- self or his successors on questions of postwar policy. The reply further stated that the employment agencies to be approved under the Order would in general be those which specialise in placing women with recognised professional or technical qualifications and when assistance is necessary to ensure that such women are placed to the best advantage in the national interest.

Photo of Mr William Craven-Ellis Mr William Craven-Ellis , Southampton

Is it not reasonable that these private organisations should have the same undertaking given to them as has been given to the trade unions, to restore their practices when the war is over?

Photo of Mr Ernest Bevin Mr Ernest Bevin , Wandsworth Central

The question of what is to happen to all these things after the war depends on the end of the Defence of the Realm Regulations. Beyond that I cannot commit Parliament.

Photo of Mr William Craven-Ellis Mr William Craven-Ellis , Southampton

But we have had special legislation, and I would ask my right hon. Friend again whether he will not give this matter fuller consideration.

Photo of Mr Ernest Bevin Mr Ernest Bevin , Wandsworth Central

I cannot introduce special measures for special businesses under the Defence Regulations. You have to go into the whole range of businesses if you do that.

Photo of Mr William Craven-Ellis Mr William Craven-Ellis , Southampton

asked the Minister of Labour whether, before the Employment of Women (Control of Engagement) Order, No. 100 was brought before Parliament, he discussed its provisions with any bodies truly representative of domestic and black-coated workers and their employers?

Photo of Mr Ernest Bevin Mr Ernest Bevin , Wandsworth Central

I would refer my hon. Friend to the Answer given to the hon. and gallant Member for King's Norton (Major Peto) on 10th March, of which I am sending him a copy