British Restaurants.

Oral Answers to Questions — Food Supplies. – in the House of Commons on 28th January 1942.

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Photo of Mr Kenneth Lindsay Mr Kenneth Lindsay , Kilmarnock

asked the Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Food whether any new conditions are now laid down before sanction is given for the establishment of a British Restaurant?

Major Lloyd George:

New conditions affecting the establishment of British Restaurants have not been laid down. The policy of my Noble Friend has always been that before plans for a British Restaurant in any locality are approved full regard should be paid to the existing catering facilities and, when the latter are adequate both in capacity and price, a further restaurant should not be established. My Noble Friend has recently reaffirmed that policy and has given an undertaking that, should a local catering association make representations to him in regard to a proposal by a local authority to establish a British Restaurant on the ground that the catering trade in the area can give the required service, full inquiry will be made locally by a representative of the Ministry of Food before approval is given to the establishment of the restaurant.

Viscountess Astor:

Is it not true that in some devastated areas people could not be fed if it were not for the British Restaurants?

Major Lloyd George:

That is perfectly true.

Photo of Mr Kenneth Lindsay Mr Kenneth Lindsay , Kilmarnock

Will the right hon. and gallant Gentleman make that answer widely known to those interested?

Major Lloyd George:

Yes, Sir.

Photo of Captain William Strickland Captain William Strickland , Coventry

Among the conditions laid down will the right hon. and gallant Gentleman consider one which would forbid British Restaurants to sell goods for consumption off the premises?

Major Lloyd George:

No, the cash and carry service is an essential part of the Ministry's work in feeding workers in those areas where British Restaurants are functioning.

Photo of Captain William Strickland Captain William Strickland , Coventry

Is the right hon. and gallant Gentleman aware that by this method people receive more than their fair ration?

Major Lloyd George:

One of the main purposes of British Restaurants is to extend to all classes the supplementing of their rations, which has of course always been available to those in a position to go to restaurants and hotels.