Railings (Requisitioning).

Oral Answers to Questions — Ministry of Supply. – in the House of Commons on 21st January 1942.

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Photo of Major-General Sir Alfred Knox Major-General Sir Alfred Knox , Wycombe

asked the Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Supply for what reason the circular letter, of 11th September, from his Ministry instructing local authorities to prepare schedules of iron railings for requisition omitted to impose on the surveyor the obligation to notify the owner which of his possessions it was proposed to confiscate?

Photo of Mr Harold Macmillan Mr Harold Macmillan , Stockton-on-Tees

The circular letter required local authorities to give public notice of intention to conduct the survey, and again, when notified by the Ministry of Works and Buildings that a clearance scheme was to be carried out in their area, to publish in the local Press and exhibit in public places notices indicating the streets and places from which it was intended to remove the railings.

Photo of Major-General Sir Alfred Knox Major-General Sir Alfred Knox , Wycombe

Surely, notice ought to be given, as it is incumbent upon the unfortunate owner, if he wants to make an appeal, to do so within 14 days, and is it not a fact that these surveys are made largely by voluntary women workers who are really not competent to carry out the work?

Photo of Mr Harold Macmillan Mr Harold Macmillan , Stockton-on-Tees

That is another point. One of the difficulties in giving notice to individual owners is that often a great number of different people have an interest in some of the railings, and it is very difficult to trace all of them.

Photo of Mr Robert Young Mr Robert Young , Newton

Is the Minister aware that sometimes only six or seven hours' notice is given?