Colonial Allowances.

Oral Answers to Questions — British Army. – in the House of Commons on 3rd May 1938.

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Vice-Admiral Taylor:

asked the Secretary of State for War what payments will be made to a major, with a wife and one child of 13 years of age, removing his family from England to Hong Kong, on account of the tickets for his wife and child; and what he will receive after arrival on account of the newly increased colonial allowance and marriage allowance, respectively?

Photo of Mr Leslie Hore-Belisha Mr Leslie Hore-Belisha , Plymouth, Devonport

I would propose, with my hon. and gallant Friend's permission, to circulate the figures required in the OFFICIAL REPORT.

Vice-Admiral Taylor:

Can my right hon. Friend say what the increase in the colonial allowance amounts to?

Photo of Mr Leslie Hore-Belisha Mr Leslie Hore-Belisha , Plymouth, Devonport

The answer is a little long. The increase, of course, varies with the rank, and I could not give a comprehensive statement in a simple sentence.

Following is the answer:

Free passages would be provided by the War Office for the wife and child, for whom a charge would be made of 6s. 6d. a day each as a contribution to the cost of their messing on board ship. There is a half rate of 3s. 3d. a day for messing for each child between 1 and 12 years of age. Colonial allowance would be 3 dollars 90 cents a day. Marriage allowance is not issuable to officers. A married officer at Hong Kong whose family resides with him, but not in quarters, would receive higher rates of lodging, fuel, light and fan-current allowances than a single officer. In the case of a married major, the daily rates of these allowances total 6 dollars 74 cents. In addition, he would get furniture allowance at 2s. (sterling) a day.