BRITISH BROADCASTING CORPORATION (LAMBERT v. LEVITA).

Oral Answers to Questions — Transport. – in the House of Commons on 12th November 1936.

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Photo of Mr William Dobbie Mr William Dobbie , Rotherham

asked the Prime Minister whether, in view of the evidence given in the recent case of Lambert v. Levita, before Mr. Justice Swift and a special jury, that an attempt had been made by high personages connected with the British Broadcasting Corporation to compel Mr. Lambert to desist from his action under threat of dismissal, he will take the necessary action, with, a view to setting up an inquiry under the Tribunals of Inquiry Act, 1921, into, the truth of the allegations made against individuals holding influential positions in the British Broadcasting Corporation?

Photo of Mr Stanley Baldwin Mr Stanley Baldwin , Bewdley

I do not think that action under the Tribunals of Inquiry Act is appropriate in this instance. I have already appointed a special board, consisting of Sir Josiah Stamp, Sir Maurice Gwyer, and Sir Findlater Stewart, to inquire into the matter. I take this opportunity to mention that, as soon as the case referred to ended, the Chairman of the 'British Broadcasting Corporation wrote to me saying that he and his colleagues would welcome an inquiry.

Photo of Mr Clement Attlee Mr Clement Attlee , Stepney Limehouse

Can the right hon. Gentleman say whether that report will be made public, and whether there will be an opportunity for debate in the House before the new appointments to the Broadcasting Committee are made and before the new Charter is finally settled?

Photo of Mr Stanley Baldwin Mr Stanley Baldwin , Bewdley

I have a note which, I think, will explain the position to the Leader of the Opposition. The board reports its findings on fact, with any observations, to the Prime Minister. The Prime Minister then makes a decision and this decision, together with the report itself, is published. I think it is obvious that the matter would be a proper one for debate, but I should like to consider the point put to me my the right hon. Gentleman.