Adjournment Motions.

– in the House of Commons at on 6 October 1931.

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Motion made, and Question proposed, That there be laid before the House a Return of Motions for Adjournment under Standing Order No. 10, showing the date of such Motion, the name of the Member proposing, the definite matter of urgent public importance, and the result of any Division taken thereon, during Session 1930–31 (in continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 4, of Session 1930–31)."—[The Deputy-Chairman.]

Photo of Lieut-Colonel Charles Howard-Bury Lieut-Colonel Charles Howard-Bury , Chelmsford

There are two pages of Motions for Returns and those Returns, when printed, will probably run into several hundred's of pages. Is there any means of opposing any of these Motions on the ground of economy? Many of them are not necessary and are only of academic interest to the House. I would mention, for instance, Motion's No. 8 and No. 9, relating to the number of hours of sittings and the hours of adjournment, and the duration of the sittings of Committees. In these days, should not the House set an example of economy to others in this respect?

Mr. SPEAKER:

If the hon. and gallant Member takes objection, these Returns would have to stand over.

1.2.3.4.5.6.
Date when Closure moved, and by whom.Question before House or Committee when moved.Whether in House or Committee.Whether assent given to Motion or withheld by Speaker or Chairman.Assent withheld because, in the opinion of the Chair, a decision would shortly be arrived at without that Motion.Result of Motion and, if a Division, Numbers for and against.
and (2) in the Standing Committees under the following heads:
1.2.3.4.5.
Date when Closure moved, and by whom.Question before Committee when moved.Whether assent given to Motion or withheld by Chairman.Assent withheld because, in the opinion of the Chair, a decision would shortly be arrived at without that Motion.Result of Motion and, if a Division, Numbers for and against.
(in continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 6, of Session 1930–31)."—[The Deputy-Chairman.]

Photo of Mr Robert Bourne Mr Robert Bourne , Oxford

These Returns have always been given to the House and the great majority of them are absolutely necessary, particularly for the Committee of Selection and the Committee Office. As regards No. 8, to which the hon. and gallant Member referred, the return in that case is not printed, but is kept in manuscript. I would point out that in any case these returns have to be made, because they are required for the officials of the House and the only question is whether they are to be printed or not. The work of preparation is done by the officials of the House, and the actual cost of printing is comparatively slight, and the economy to be effected in that respect would therefore be comparatively small. I hope, with that explanation, that the House will agree to these customary Returns.

Question put, and agreed to.